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45.7 Million Gallons of Propane Recalled Due to Burn, Fire Risk

45.7 Million Gallons of Propane Recalled Due to Burn, Fire Risk



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The affected propane might not contain enough odorant to alert users to gas leaks

Dreamstime

Millions of gallons of propane gas have been recalled.

Millions of Americans use propane for cooking and grilling, and this week the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission announced a recall of more than 45.7 million gallons of propane on the grounds that it could be dangerous and cause a risk of fires, burns, and serious damage.

According to the CPSC, the problem with the propane gas affected by this recall is that it does not contain enough odorant. Propane on its own is odorless, which means that in the event of a leak, propane could build up and cause a serious risk of fire or explosion without a person ever knowing it was happening. To prevent that kind of situation, odorant is added to propane so that if a leak were to occur, a user would be able to smell it.

The recalled propane is from Western Gas, and it was reportedly distributed in Colorado, Montana, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming, from April 2015 to October 2017. The propane was reportedly delivered to customers' storage tanks, and also sold in portable canisters for use in grills, stoves, recreational vehicles, and other appliances. The affected propane was delivered by various companies and sold by various retailers.

It’s important that people not attempt to test their propane on their own, however. Anybody who has propane delivered to storage tanks or has purchased a portable propane canister should contact the retailer or Western Gas to determine if the propane is part of the recall. If it is, Western Gas will either arrange for additional odorization or replace the affected propane. No injuries have yet been reported, but it’s important to be safe when dealing with propane. Anybody who plans on grilling with propane should also check out these nine other tips for grilling safely.


Dakota Access Pipeline protests

The Dakota Access Pipeline protests, also called by the hashtag #NoDAPL, were grassroots movements that began in early 2016 in reaction to the approved construction of Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access Pipeline in the northern United States. The pipeline was projected to run from the Bakken oil fields in western North Dakota to southern Illinois, crossing beneath the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, as well as under part of Lake Oahe near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Many in the Standing Rock tribe and surrounding communities consider the pipeline to constitute a serious threat to the region's water. The construction is also seen as a direct threat to ancient burial grounds and cultural sites of historic importance.

Play media

In April 2016, youth from Standing Rock and surrounding Native American communities organized a campaign to stop the pipeline, calling themselves, "ReZpect Our Water". [6] Inspired by the youth, several adults, including Joye Braun of the Indigenous Environmental Network [7] and tribal historian LaDonna Brave Bull Allard established a water protectors' camp as a center for direct action, spiritual resistance to the pipeline, cultural preservation, and defense of Indigenous sovereignty. The #NoDAPL hashtag began to trend on social media and, gradually, the camps at Standing Rock grew to thousands of people. [7]

In September 2016, construction workers bulldozed a section of privately owned land the tribe had claimed as sacred ground, and when protesters trespassed into the area security workers used attack dogs which bit at least six of the protesters and one horse. [8] In October 2016, police with riot gear and military equipment cleared an encampment that was directly in the proposed pipeline's path. [9] In November 2016, police use of water cannons on protesters in freezing weather drew significant media attention. [10]

During the protest numerous high-profile activists and Congressional Democrats spoke out for the rights of the tribe. Bernie Sanders actively supported the movement [11] [12] and President Obama spoke with tribal leaders and offered his support. Standing Rock Chairman David Archambault II, who was himself arrested and strip searched while protesting, gave numerous interviews explaining the tribe's positions he also addressed the tribe's positions at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland.

In an October 28, 2016 public statement, Chief Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader and Keeper of the Sacred Pipe Bundle of the Lakota/Dakota/Nakota Nations, invoked his role as the voice of traditional government of the Great Sioux Nation and called upon President Barack Obama to communicate "nation to nation, as indicated by our treaties." [13]

In December 2016, under President Barack Obama's administration the Corps of Engineers denied an easement for construction of the pipeline under the Missouri River. [14] [15] [16] On January 24, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order that reversed the Obama legislation and advanced the construction of the pipeline, expediting the environmental review, which Trump described as an "incredibly cumbersome, long, horrible permitting process." [17] [18] On February 7, 2017, President Trump authorized the Army Corps of Engineers to proceed, ending the environmental impact assessment and the associated public comment period. [19] The pipeline was completed by April and its first oil was delivered on May 14, 2017. [20]

A United States District Judge ruled in March 2020 that the government had not studied the pipeline's "effects on the quality of the human environment" enough, ordering the United States Army Corps of Engineers to conduct a new environmental impact review. [21] In July 2020, a District Court judge issued a ruling for the pipeline to be shut down and emptied of oil pending a new environmental review. [22] [23] The temporary shutdown order was overturned by a U.S. appeals court on August 5, though the environmental review was ordered to continue. [24]

Journalists, such as Amy Goodman, political figures such as Jill Stein and Ajamu Baraka, actress Shailene Woodley, and numerous members of the left-leaning media collective Unicorn Riot were arrested. [25] [26] [27] [28] [ excessive citations ]


Dakota Access Pipeline protests

The Dakota Access Pipeline protests, also called by the hashtag #NoDAPL, were grassroots movements that began in early 2016 in reaction to the approved construction of Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access Pipeline in the northern United States. The pipeline was projected to run from the Bakken oil fields in western North Dakota to southern Illinois, crossing beneath the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, as well as under part of Lake Oahe near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Many in the Standing Rock tribe and surrounding communities consider the pipeline to constitute a serious threat to the region's water. The construction is also seen as a direct threat to ancient burial grounds and cultural sites of historic importance.

Play media

In April 2016, youth from Standing Rock and surrounding Native American communities organized a campaign to stop the pipeline, calling themselves, "ReZpect Our Water". [6] Inspired by the youth, several adults, including Joye Braun of the Indigenous Environmental Network [7] and tribal historian LaDonna Brave Bull Allard established a water protectors' camp as a center for direct action, spiritual resistance to the pipeline, cultural preservation, and defense of Indigenous sovereignty. The #NoDAPL hashtag began to trend on social media and, gradually, the camps at Standing Rock grew to thousands of people. [7]

In September 2016, construction workers bulldozed a section of privately owned land the tribe had claimed as sacred ground, and when protesters trespassed into the area security workers used attack dogs which bit at least six of the protesters and one horse. [8] In October 2016, police with riot gear and military equipment cleared an encampment that was directly in the proposed pipeline's path. [9] In November 2016, police use of water cannons on protesters in freezing weather drew significant media attention. [10]

During the protest numerous high-profile activists and Congressional Democrats spoke out for the rights of the tribe. Bernie Sanders actively supported the movement [11] [12] and President Obama spoke with tribal leaders and offered his support. Standing Rock Chairman David Archambault II, who was himself arrested and strip searched while protesting, gave numerous interviews explaining the tribe's positions he also addressed the tribe's positions at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland.

In an October 28, 2016 public statement, Chief Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader and Keeper of the Sacred Pipe Bundle of the Lakota/Dakota/Nakota Nations, invoked his role as the voice of traditional government of the Great Sioux Nation and called upon President Barack Obama to communicate "nation to nation, as indicated by our treaties." [13]

In December 2016, under President Barack Obama's administration the Corps of Engineers denied an easement for construction of the pipeline under the Missouri River. [14] [15] [16] On January 24, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order that reversed the Obama legislation and advanced the construction of the pipeline, expediting the environmental review, which Trump described as an "incredibly cumbersome, long, horrible permitting process." [17] [18] On February 7, 2017, President Trump authorized the Army Corps of Engineers to proceed, ending the environmental impact assessment and the associated public comment period. [19] The pipeline was completed by April and its first oil was delivered on May 14, 2017. [20]

A United States District Judge ruled in March 2020 that the government had not studied the pipeline's "effects on the quality of the human environment" enough, ordering the United States Army Corps of Engineers to conduct a new environmental impact review. [21] In July 2020, a District Court judge issued a ruling for the pipeline to be shut down and emptied of oil pending a new environmental review. [22] [23] The temporary shutdown order was overturned by a U.S. appeals court on August 5, though the environmental review was ordered to continue. [24]

Journalists, such as Amy Goodman, political figures such as Jill Stein and Ajamu Baraka, actress Shailene Woodley, and numerous members of the left-leaning media collective Unicorn Riot were arrested. [25] [26] [27] [28] [ excessive citations ]


Dakota Access Pipeline protests

The Dakota Access Pipeline protests, also called by the hashtag #NoDAPL, were grassroots movements that began in early 2016 in reaction to the approved construction of Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access Pipeline in the northern United States. The pipeline was projected to run from the Bakken oil fields in western North Dakota to southern Illinois, crossing beneath the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, as well as under part of Lake Oahe near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Many in the Standing Rock tribe and surrounding communities consider the pipeline to constitute a serious threat to the region's water. The construction is also seen as a direct threat to ancient burial grounds and cultural sites of historic importance.

Play media

In April 2016, youth from Standing Rock and surrounding Native American communities organized a campaign to stop the pipeline, calling themselves, "ReZpect Our Water". [6] Inspired by the youth, several adults, including Joye Braun of the Indigenous Environmental Network [7] and tribal historian LaDonna Brave Bull Allard established a water protectors' camp as a center for direct action, spiritual resistance to the pipeline, cultural preservation, and defense of Indigenous sovereignty. The #NoDAPL hashtag began to trend on social media and, gradually, the camps at Standing Rock grew to thousands of people. [7]

In September 2016, construction workers bulldozed a section of privately owned land the tribe had claimed as sacred ground, and when protesters trespassed into the area security workers used attack dogs which bit at least six of the protesters and one horse. [8] In October 2016, police with riot gear and military equipment cleared an encampment that was directly in the proposed pipeline's path. [9] In November 2016, police use of water cannons on protesters in freezing weather drew significant media attention. [10]

During the protest numerous high-profile activists and Congressional Democrats spoke out for the rights of the tribe. Bernie Sanders actively supported the movement [11] [12] and President Obama spoke with tribal leaders and offered his support. Standing Rock Chairman David Archambault II, who was himself arrested and strip searched while protesting, gave numerous interviews explaining the tribe's positions he also addressed the tribe's positions at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland.

In an October 28, 2016 public statement, Chief Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader and Keeper of the Sacred Pipe Bundle of the Lakota/Dakota/Nakota Nations, invoked his role as the voice of traditional government of the Great Sioux Nation and called upon President Barack Obama to communicate "nation to nation, as indicated by our treaties." [13]

In December 2016, under President Barack Obama's administration the Corps of Engineers denied an easement for construction of the pipeline under the Missouri River. [14] [15] [16] On January 24, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order that reversed the Obama legislation and advanced the construction of the pipeline, expediting the environmental review, which Trump described as an "incredibly cumbersome, long, horrible permitting process." [17] [18] On February 7, 2017, President Trump authorized the Army Corps of Engineers to proceed, ending the environmental impact assessment and the associated public comment period. [19] The pipeline was completed by April and its first oil was delivered on May 14, 2017. [20]

A United States District Judge ruled in March 2020 that the government had not studied the pipeline's "effects on the quality of the human environment" enough, ordering the United States Army Corps of Engineers to conduct a new environmental impact review. [21] In July 2020, a District Court judge issued a ruling for the pipeline to be shut down and emptied of oil pending a new environmental review. [22] [23] The temporary shutdown order was overturned by a U.S. appeals court on August 5, though the environmental review was ordered to continue. [24]

Journalists, such as Amy Goodman, political figures such as Jill Stein and Ajamu Baraka, actress Shailene Woodley, and numerous members of the left-leaning media collective Unicorn Riot were arrested. [25] [26] [27] [28] [ excessive citations ]


Dakota Access Pipeline protests

The Dakota Access Pipeline protests, also called by the hashtag #NoDAPL, were grassroots movements that began in early 2016 in reaction to the approved construction of Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access Pipeline in the northern United States. The pipeline was projected to run from the Bakken oil fields in western North Dakota to southern Illinois, crossing beneath the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, as well as under part of Lake Oahe near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Many in the Standing Rock tribe and surrounding communities consider the pipeline to constitute a serious threat to the region's water. The construction is also seen as a direct threat to ancient burial grounds and cultural sites of historic importance.

Play media

In April 2016, youth from Standing Rock and surrounding Native American communities organized a campaign to stop the pipeline, calling themselves, "ReZpect Our Water". [6] Inspired by the youth, several adults, including Joye Braun of the Indigenous Environmental Network [7] and tribal historian LaDonna Brave Bull Allard established a water protectors' camp as a center for direct action, spiritual resistance to the pipeline, cultural preservation, and defense of Indigenous sovereignty. The #NoDAPL hashtag began to trend on social media and, gradually, the camps at Standing Rock grew to thousands of people. [7]

In September 2016, construction workers bulldozed a section of privately owned land the tribe had claimed as sacred ground, and when protesters trespassed into the area security workers used attack dogs which bit at least six of the protesters and one horse. [8] In October 2016, police with riot gear and military equipment cleared an encampment that was directly in the proposed pipeline's path. [9] In November 2016, police use of water cannons on protesters in freezing weather drew significant media attention. [10]

During the protest numerous high-profile activists and Congressional Democrats spoke out for the rights of the tribe. Bernie Sanders actively supported the movement [11] [12] and President Obama spoke with tribal leaders and offered his support. Standing Rock Chairman David Archambault II, who was himself arrested and strip searched while protesting, gave numerous interviews explaining the tribe's positions he also addressed the tribe's positions at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland.

In an October 28, 2016 public statement, Chief Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader and Keeper of the Sacred Pipe Bundle of the Lakota/Dakota/Nakota Nations, invoked his role as the voice of traditional government of the Great Sioux Nation and called upon President Barack Obama to communicate "nation to nation, as indicated by our treaties." [13]

In December 2016, under President Barack Obama's administration the Corps of Engineers denied an easement for construction of the pipeline under the Missouri River. [14] [15] [16] On January 24, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order that reversed the Obama legislation and advanced the construction of the pipeline, expediting the environmental review, which Trump described as an "incredibly cumbersome, long, horrible permitting process." [17] [18] On February 7, 2017, President Trump authorized the Army Corps of Engineers to proceed, ending the environmental impact assessment and the associated public comment period. [19] The pipeline was completed by April and its first oil was delivered on May 14, 2017. [20]

A United States District Judge ruled in March 2020 that the government had not studied the pipeline's "effects on the quality of the human environment" enough, ordering the United States Army Corps of Engineers to conduct a new environmental impact review. [21] In July 2020, a District Court judge issued a ruling for the pipeline to be shut down and emptied of oil pending a new environmental review. [22] [23] The temporary shutdown order was overturned by a U.S. appeals court on August 5, though the environmental review was ordered to continue. [24]

Journalists, such as Amy Goodman, political figures such as Jill Stein and Ajamu Baraka, actress Shailene Woodley, and numerous members of the left-leaning media collective Unicorn Riot were arrested. [25] [26] [27] [28] [ excessive citations ]


Dakota Access Pipeline protests

The Dakota Access Pipeline protests, also called by the hashtag #NoDAPL, were grassroots movements that began in early 2016 in reaction to the approved construction of Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access Pipeline in the northern United States. The pipeline was projected to run from the Bakken oil fields in western North Dakota to southern Illinois, crossing beneath the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, as well as under part of Lake Oahe near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Many in the Standing Rock tribe and surrounding communities consider the pipeline to constitute a serious threat to the region's water. The construction is also seen as a direct threat to ancient burial grounds and cultural sites of historic importance.

Play media

In April 2016, youth from Standing Rock and surrounding Native American communities organized a campaign to stop the pipeline, calling themselves, "ReZpect Our Water". [6] Inspired by the youth, several adults, including Joye Braun of the Indigenous Environmental Network [7] and tribal historian LaDonna Brave Bull Allard established a water protectors' camp as a center for direct action, spiritual resistance to the pipeline, cultural preservation, and defense of Indigenous sovereignty. The #NoDAPL hashtag began to trend on social media and, gradually, the camps at Standing Rock grew to thousands of people. [7]

In September 2016, construction workers bulldozed a section of privately owned land the tribe had claimed as sacred ground, and when protesters trespassed into the area security workers used attack dogs which bit at least six of the protesters and one horse. [8] In October 2016, police with riot gear and military equipment cleared an encampment that was directly in the proposed pipeline's path. [9] In November 2016, police use of water cannons on protesters in freezing weather drew significant media attention. [10]

During the protest numerous high-profile activists and Congressional Democrats spoke out for the rights of the tribe. Bernie Sanders actively supported the movement [11] [12] and President Obama spoke with tribal leaders and offered his support. Standing Rock Chairman David Archambault II, who was himself arrested and strip searched while protesting, gave numerous interviews explaining the tribe's positions he also addressed the tribe's positions at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland.

In an October 28, 2016 public statement, Chief Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader and Keeper of the Sacred Pipe Bundle of the Lakota/Dakota/Nakota Nations, invoked his role as the voice of traditional government of the Great Sioux Nation and called upon President Barack Obama to communicate "nation to nation, as indicated by our treaties." [13]

In December 2016, under President Barack Obama's administration the Corps of Engineers denied an easement for construction of the pipeline under the Missouri River. [14] [15] [16] On January 24, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order that reversed the Obama legislation and advanced the construction of the pipeline, expediting the environmental review, which Trump described as an "incredibly cumbersome, long, horrible permitting process." [17] [18] On February 7, 2017, President Trump authorized the Army Corps of Engineers to proceed, ending the environmental impact assessment and the associated public comment period. [19] The pipeline was completed by April and its first oil was delivered on May 14, 2017. [20]

A United States District Judge ruled in March 2020 that the government had not studied the pipeline's "effects on the quality of the human environment" enough, ordering the United States Army Corps of Engineers to conduct a new environmental impact review. [21] In July 2020, a District Court judge issued a ruling for the pipeline to be shut down and emptied of oil pending a new environmental review. [22] [23] The temporary shutdown order was overturned by a U.S. appeals court on August 5, though the environmental review was ordered to continue. [24]

Journalists, such as Amy Goodman, political figures such as Jill Stein and Ajamu Baraka, actress Shailene Woodley, and numerous members of the left-leaning media collective Unicorn Riot were arrested. [25] [26] [27] [28] [ excessive citations ]


Dakota Access Pipeline protests

The Dakota Access Pipeline protests, also called by the hashtag #NoDAPL, were grassroots movements that began in early 2016 in reaction to the approved construction of Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access Pipeline in the northern United States. The pipeline was projected to run from the Bakken oil fields in western North Dakota to southern Illinois, crossing beneath the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, as well as under part of Lake Oahe near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Many in the Standing Rock tribe and surrounding communities consider the pipeline to constitute a serious threat to the region's water. The construction is also seen as a direct threat to ancient burial grounds and cultural sites of historic importance.

Play media

In April 2016, youth from Standing Rock and surrounding Native American communities organized a campaign to stop the pipeline, calling themselves, "ReZpect Our Water". [6] Inspired by the youth, several adults, including Joye Braun of the Indigenous Environmental Network [7] and tribal historian LaDonna Brave Bull Allard established a water protectors' camp as a center for direct action, spiritual resistance to the pipeline, cultural preservation, and defense of Indigenous sovereignty. The #NoDAPL hashtag began to trend on social media and, gradually, the camps at Standing Rock grew to thousands of people. [7]

In September 2016, construction workers bulldozed a section of privately owned land the tribe had claimed as sacred ground, and when protesters trespassed into the area security workers used attack dogs which bit at least six of the protesters and one horse. [8] In October 2016, police with riot gear and military equipment cleared an encampment that was directly in the proposed pipeline's path. [9] In November 2016, police use of water cannons on protesters in freezing weather drew significant media attention. [10]

During the protest numerous high-profile activists and Congressional Democrats spoke out for the rights of the tribe. Bernie Sanders actively supported the movement [11] [12] and President Obama spoke with tribal leaders and offered his support. Standing Rock Chairman David Archambault II, who was himself arrested and strip searched while protesting, gave numerous interviews explaining the tribe's positions he also addressed the tribe's positions at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland.

In an October 28, 2016 public statement, Chief Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader and Keeper of the Sacred Pipe Bundle of the Lakota/Dakota/Nakota Nations, invoked his role as the voice of traditional government of the Great Sioux Nation and called upon President Barack Obama to communicate "nation to nation, as indicated by our treaties." [13]

In December 2016, under President Barack Obama's administration the Corps of Engineers denied an easement for construction of the pipeline under the Missouri River. [14] [15] [16] On January 24, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order that reversed the Obama legislation and advanced the construction of the pipeline, expediting the environmental review, which Trump described as an "incredibly cumbersome, long, horrible permitting process." [17] [18] On February 7, 2017, President Trump authorized the Army Corps of Engineers to proceed, ending the environmental impact assessment and the associated public comment period. [19] The pipeline was completed by April and its first oil was delivered on May 14, 2017. [20]

A United States District Judge ruled in March 2020 that the government had not studied the pipeline's "effects on the quality of the human environment" enough, ordering the United States Army Corps of Engineers to conduct a new environmental impact review. [21] In July 2020, a District Court judge issued a ruling for the pipeline to be shut down and emptied of oil pending a new environmental review. [22] [23] The temporary shutdown order was overturned by a U.S. appeals court on August 5, though the environmental review was ordered to continue. [24]

Journalists, such as Amy Goodman, political figures such as Jill Stein and Ajamu Baraka, actress Shailene Woodley, and numerous members of the left-leaning media collective Unicorn Riot were arrested. [25] [26] [27] [28] [ excessive citations ]


Dakota Access Pipeline protests

The Dakota Access Pipeline protests, also called by the hashtag #NoDAPL, were grassroots movements that began in early 2016 in reaction to the approved construction of Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access Pipeline in the northern United States. The pipeline was projected to run from the Bakken oil fields in western North Dakota to southern Illinois, crossing beneath the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, as well as under part of Lake Oahe near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Many in the Standing Rock tribe and surrounding communities consider the pipeline to constitute a serious threat to the region's water. The construction is also seen as a direct threat to ancient burial grounds and cultural sites of historic importance.

Play media

In April 2016, youth from Standing Rock and surrounding Native American communities organized a campaign to stop the pipeline, calling themselves, "ReZpect Our Water". [6] Inspired by the youth, several adults, including Joye Braun of the Indigenous Environmental Network [7] and tribal historian LaDonna Brave Bull Allard established a water protectors' camp as a center for direct action, spiritual resistance to the pipeline, cultural preservation, and defense of Indigenous sovereignty. The #NoDAPL hashtag began to trend on social media and, gradually, the camps at Standing Rock grew to thousands of people. [7]

In September 2016, construction workers bulldozed a section of privately owned land the tribe had claimed as sacred ground, and when protesters trespassed into the area security workers used attack dogs which bit at least six of the protesters and one horse. [8] In October 2016, police with riot gear and military equipment cleared an encampment that was directly in the proposed pipeline's path. [9] In November 2016, police use of water cannons on protesters in freezing weather drew significant media attention. [10]

During the protest numerous high-profile activists and Congressional Democrats spoke out for the rights of the tribe. Bernie Sanders actively supported the movement [11] [12] and President Obama spoke with tribal leaders and offered his support. Standing Rock Chairman David Archambault II, who was himself arrested and strip searched while protesting, gave numerous interviews explaining the tribe's positions he also addressed the tribe's positions at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland.

In an October 28, 2016 public statement, Chief Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader and Keeper of the Sacred Pipe Bundle of the Lakota/Dakota/Nakota Nations, invoked his role as the voice of traditional government of the Great Sioux Nation and called upon President Barack Obama to communicate "nation to nation, as indicated by our treaties." [13]

In December 2016, under President Barack Obama's administration the Corps of Engineers denied an easement for construction of the pipeline under the Missouri River. [14] [15] [16] On January 24, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order that reversed the Obama legislation and advanced the construction of the pipeline, expediting the environmental review, which Trump described as an "incredibly cumbersome, long, horrible permitting process." [17] [18] On February 7, 2017, President Trump authorized the Army Corps of Engineers to proceed, ending the environmental impact assessment and the associated public comment period. [19] The pipeline was completed by April and its first oil was delivered on May 14, 2017. [20]

A United States District Judge ruled in March 2020 that the government had not studied the pipeline's "effects on the quality of the human environment" enough, ordering the United States Army Corps of Engineers to conduct a new environmental impact review. [21] In July 2020, a District Court judge issued a ruling for the pipeline to be shut down and emptied of oil pending a new environmental review. [22] [23] The temporary shutdown order was overturned by a U.S. appeals court on August 5, though the environmental review was ordered to continue. [24]

Journalists, such as Amy Goodman, political figures such as Jill Stein and Ajamu Baraka, actress Shailene Woodley, and numerous members of the left-leaning media collective Unicorn Riot were arrested. [25] [26] [27] [28] [ excessive citations ]


Dakota Access Pipeline protests

The Dakota Access Pipeline protests, also called by the hashtag #NoDAPL, were grassroots movements that began in early 2016 in reaction to the approved construction of Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access Pipeline in the northern United States. The pipeline was projected to run from the Bakken oil fields in western North Dakota to southern Illinois, crossing beneath the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, as well as under part of Lake Oahe near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Many in the Standing Rock tribe and surrounding communities consider the pipeline to constitute a serious threat to the region's water. The construction is also seen as a direct threat to ancient burial grounds and cultural sites of historic importance.

Play media

In April 2016, youth from Standing Rock and surrounding Native American communities organized a campaign to stop the pipeline, calling themselves, "ReZpect Our Water". [6] Inspired by the youth, several adults, including Joye Braun of the Indigenous Environmental Network [7] and tribal historian LaDonna Brave Bull Allard established a water protectors' camp as a center for direct action, spiritual resistance to the pipeline, cultural preservation, and defense of Indigenous sovereignty. The #NoDAPL hashtag began to trend on social media and, gradually, the camps at Standing Rock grew to thousands of people. [7]

In September 2016, construction workers bulldozed a section of privately owned land the tribe had claimed as sacred ground, and when protesters trespassed into the area security workers used attack dogs which bit at least six of the protesters and one horse. [8] In October 2016, police with riot gear and military equipment cleared an encampment that was directly in the proposed pipeline's path. [9] In November 2016, police use of water cannons on protesters in freezing weather drew significant media attention. [10]

During the protest numerous high-profile activists and Congressional Democrats spoke out for the rights of the tribe. Bernie Sanders actively supported the movement [11] [12] and President Obama spoke with tribal leaders and offered his support. Standing Rock Chairman David Archambault II, who was himself arrested and strip searched while protesting, gave numerous interviews explaining the tribe's positions he also addressed the tribe's positions at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland.

In an October 28, 2016 public statement, Chief Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader and Keeper of the Sacred Pipe Bundle of the Lakota/Dakota/Nakota Nations, invoked his role as the voice of traditional government of the Great Sioux Nation and called upon President Barack Obama to communicate "nation to nation, as indicated by our treaties." [13]

In December 2016, under President Barack Obama's administration the Corps of Engineers denied an easement for construction of the pipeline under the Missouri River. [14] [15] [16] On January 24, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order that reversed the Obama legislation and advanced the construction of the pipeline, expediting the environmental review, which Trump described as an "incredibly cumbersome, long, horrible permitting process." [17] [18] On February 7, 2017, President Trump authorized the Army Corps of Engineers to proceed, ending the environmental impact assessment and the associated public comment period. [19] The pipeline was completed by April and its first oil was delivered on May 14, 2017. [20]

A United States District Judge ruled in March 2020 that the government had not studied the pipeline's "effects on the quality of the human environment" enough, ordering the United States Army Corps of Engineers to conduct a new environmental impact review. [21] In July 2020, a District Court judge issued a ruling for the pipeline to be shut down and emptied of oil pending a new environmental review. [22] [23] The temporary shutdown order was overturned by a U.S. appeals court on August 5, though the environmental review was ordered to continue. [24]

Journalists, such as Amy Goodman, political figures such as Jill Stein and Ajamu Baraka, actress Shailene Woodley, and numerous members of the left-leaning media collective Unicorn Riot were arrested. [25] [26] [27] [28] [ excessive citations ]


Dakota Access Pipeline protests

The Dakota Access Pipeline protests, also called by the hashtag #NoDAPL, were grassroots movements that began in early 2016 in reaction to the approved construction of Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access Pipeline in the northern United States. The pipeline was projected to run from the Bakken oil fields in western North Dakota to southern Illinois, crossing beneath the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, as well as under part of Lake Oahe near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Many in the Standing Rock tribe and surrounding communities consider the pipeline to constitute a serious threat to the region's water. The construction is also seen as a direct threat to ancient burial grounds and cultural sites of historic importance.

Play media

In April 2016, youth from Standing Rock and surrounding Native American communities organized a campaign to stop the pipeline, calling themselves, "ReZpect Our Water". [6] Inspired by the youth, several adults, including Joye Braun of the Indigenous Environmental Network [7] and tribal historian LaDonna Brave Bull Allard established a water protectors' camp as a center for direct action, spiritual resistance to the pipeline, cultural preservation, and defense of Indigenous sovereignty. The #NoDAPL hashtag began to trend on social media and, gradually, the camps at Standing Rock grew to thousands of people. [7]

In September 2016, construction workers bulldozed a section of privately owned land the tribe had claimed as sacred ground, and when protesters trespassed into the area security workers used attack dogs which bit at least six of the protesters and one horse. [8] In October 2016, police with riot gear and military equipment cleared an encampment that was directly in the proposed pipeline's path. [9] In November 2016, police use of water cannons on protesters in freezing weather drew significant media attention. [10]

During the protest numerous high-profile activists and Congressional Democrats spoke out for the rights of the tribe. Bernie Sanders actively supported the movement [11] [12] and President Obama spoke with tribal leaders and offered his support. Standing Rock Chairman David Archambault II, who was himself arrested and strip searched while protesting, gave numerous interviews explaining the tribe's positions he also addressed the tribe's positions at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland.

In an October 28, 2016 public statement, Chief Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader and Keeper of the Sacred Pipe Bundle of the Lakota/Dakota/Nakota Nations, invoked his role as the voice of traditional government of the Great Sioux Nation and called upon President Barack Obama to communicate "nation to nation, as indicated by our treaties." [13]

In December 2016, under President Barack Obama's administration the Corps of Engineers denied an easement for construction of the pipeline under the Missouri River. [14] [15] [16] On January 24, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order that reversed the Obama legislation and advanced the construction of the pipeline, expediting the environmental review, which Trump described as an "incredibly cumbersome, long, horrible permitting process." [17] [18] On February 7, 2017, President Trump authorized the Army Corps of Engineers to proceed, ending the environmental impact assessment and the associated public comment period. [19] The pipeline was completed by April and its first oil was delivered on May 14, 2017. [20]

A United States District Judge ruled in March 2020 that the government had not studied the pipeline's "effects on the quality of the human environment" enough, ordering the United States Army Corps of Engineers to conduct a new environmental impact review. [21] In July 2020, a District Court judge issued a ruling for the pipeline to be shut down and emptied of oil pending a new environmental review. [22] [23] The temporary shutdown order was overturned by a U.S. appeals court on August 5, though the environmental review was ordered to continue. [24]

Journalists, such as Amy Goodman, political figures such as Jill Stein and Ajamu Baraka, actress Shailene Woodley, and numerous members of the left-leaning media collective Unicorn Riot were arrested. [25] [26] [27] [28] [ excessive citations ]


Dakota Access Pipeline protests

The Dakota Access Pipeline protests, also called by the hashtag #NoDAPL, were grassroots movements that began in early 2016 in reaction to the approved construction of Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access Pipeline in the northern United States. The pipeline was projected to run from the Bakken oil fields in western North Dakota to southern Illinois, crossing beneath the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, as well as under part of Lake Oahe near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Many in the Standing Rock tribe and surrounding communities consider the pipeline to constitute a serious threat to the region's water. The construction is also seen as a direct threat to ancient burial grounds and cultural sites of historic importance.

Play media

In April 2016, youth from Standing Rock and surrounding Native American communities organized a campaign to stop the pipeline, calling themselves, "ReZpect Our Water". [6] Inspired by the youth, several adults, including Joye Braun of the Indigenous Environmental Network [7] and tribal historian LaDonna Brave Bull Allard established a water protectors' camp as a center for direct action, spiritual resistance to the pipeline, cultural preservation, and defense of Indigenous sovereignty. The #NoDAPL hashtag began to trend on social media and, gradually, the camps at Standing Rock grew to thousands of people. [7]

In September 2016, construction workers bulldozed a section of privately owned land the tribe had claimed as sacred ground, and when protesters trespassed into the area security workers used attack dogs which bit at least six of the protesters and one horse. [8] In October 2016, police with riot gear and military equipment cleared an encampment that was directly in the proposed pipeline's path. [9] In November 2016, police use of water cannons on protesters in freezing weather drew significant media attention. [10]

During the protest numerous high-profile activists and Congressional Democrats spoke out for the rights of the tribe. Bernie Sanders actively supported the movement [11] [12] and President Obama spoke with tribal leaders and offered his support. Standing Rock Chairman David Archambault II, who was himself arrested and strip searched while protesting, gave numerous interviews explaining the tribe's positions he also addressed the tribe's positions at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland.

In an October 28, 2016 public statement, Chief Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader and Keeper of the Sacred Pipe Bundle of the Lakota/Dakota/Nakota Nations, invoked his role as the voice of traditional government of the Great Sioux Nation and called upon President Barack Obama to communicate "nation to nation, as indicated by our treaties." [13]

In December 2016, under President Barack Obama's administration the Corps of Engineers denied an easement for construction of the pipeline under the Missouri River. [14] [15] [16] On January 24, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order that reversed the Obama legislation and advanced the construction of the pipeline, expediting the environmental review, which Trump described as an "incredibly cumbersome, long, horrible permitting process." [17] [18] On February 7, 2017, President Trump authorized the Army Corps of Engineers to proceed, ending the environmental impact assessment and the associated public comment period. [19] The pipeline was completed by April and its first oil was delivered on May 14, 2017. [20]

A United States District Judge ruled in March 2020 that the government had not studied the pipeline's "effects on the quality of the human environment" enough, ordering the United States Army Corps of Engineers to conduct a new environmental impact review. [21] In July 2020, a District Court judge issued a ruling for the pipeline to be shut down and emptied of oil pending a new environmental review. [22] [23] The temporary shutdown order was overturned by a U.S. appeals court on August 5, though the environmental review was ordered to continue. [24]

Journalists, such as Amy Goodman, political figures such as Jill Stein and Ajamu Baraka, actress Shailene Woodley, and numerous members of the left-leaning media collective Unicorn Riot were arrested. [25] [26] [27] [28] [ excessive citations ]