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‘We Have Seen the Damage’: Celebrity Farmer Lee Jones Weighs in on Monsanto’s Roundup

‘We Have Seen the Damage’: Celebrity Farmer Lee Jones Weighs in on Monsanto’s Roundup


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Jones offered his thoughts on Roundup between sessions at his annual Roots Conference in Ohio

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Farmer Lee Jones is the unique personality behind the Chef’s Garden.

Farmer Lee Jones is the closest thing America has to a celebrity farmer. Perpetually clad in overalls and a red bowtie, Jones — named one of The 60 (Plus) Coolest People in Food and Drink by The Daily Meal — runs The Chef’s Garden, a specialty farming operation providing quality produce to chefs all over the country. He also hosts the annual Roots Conference, the third annual iteration of which took place this week in Milan, Ohio, at Jones's Culinary Vegetable Institute, an event at which farmers, chefs, and other industry movers and shakers are invited to weigh in on the future of agriculture.

This year’s conference theme was Taking Action, and speakers ruminated on how we can improve our food system, from eliminating waste, to embracing the whole food movement and providing clean water for everyone.

We caught up with Jones between sessions and asked him about some issues discussed at the conference, most notably his opinion on Monsanto’s Roundup, a line of herbicides. A committee appointed by the World Health Organization recently labeled glyphosate, a major ingredient in the herbicides, as a “probable carcinogen.”

“We are very aware of the situation surrounding Roundup and are very concerned about its long-term negative effects on soil quality and human health,” Jones told The Daily Meal. “We have seen damage to the microbial community from chemicals like Roundup: Damage that takes many years of remediation efforts to recover from…..When the antagonist suffers, the pathogen thrives, very similar to the human body…. I have heard several farmers indicating that their yields are on downward trends after multiple years of Roundup application.”

He then went on to explain that that The Chef’s Garden does not use Roundup and instead uses organic methods like planting cover crops and using compost teas to “help microbial communities thrive” without having to use herbicides and pesticides.


Advocates for Agriculture

I’m dozing, as I often do on airplanes, but the guy behind me has been broadcasting nonstop for nearly three hours. I finally admit defeat and start some serious eavesdropping. He’s talking about food, damning farming, particularly livestock farming, compensating for his lack of knowledge with volume.

I’m so tired of people who wouldn’t visit a doctor who used a stethoscope instead of an MRI demanding that farmers like me use 1930s technology to raise food. Farming has always been messy and painful, and bloody and dirty. It still is.

But now we have to listen to self-appointed experts on airplanes frightening their seatmates about the profession I have practiced for more than 30 years. I’d had enough. I turned around and politely told the lecturer that he ought not believe everything he reads. He quieted and asked me what kind of farming I do. I told him, and when he asked if I used organic farming, I said no, and left it at that. I didn’t answer with the first thought that came to mind, which is simply this: I deal in the real world, not superstitions, and unless the consumer absolutely forces my hand, I am about as likely to adopt organic methods as the Wall Street Journal is to publish their next edition by setting the type by hand.

Young turkeys aren't smart enough to come in out of the rain, and will stand outside in a downpour, with beaks open and eyes skyward, until they drown.

He was a businessman, and I’m sure spends his days with spreadsheets, projections, and marketing studies. He hasn’t used a slide rule in his career and wouldn’t make projections with tea leaves or soothsayers. He does not blame witchcraft for a bad quarter, or expect the factory that makes his product to use steam power instead of electricity, or horses and wagons to deliver his products instead of trucks and trains. But he expects me to farm like my grandfather, and not incidentally, I suppose, to live like him as well. He thinks farmers are too stupid to farm sustainably, too cruel to treat their animals well, and too careless to worry about their communities, their health, and their families. I would not presume to criticize his car, or the size of his house, or the way he runs his business. But he is an expert about me, on the strength of one book, and is sharing that expertise with captive audiences every time he gets the chance. Enough, enough, enough. Read More

So many people that I talk to that have read Pollan’s books continue to tell me that his ideas sound very reasonable. But as the old saying goes, if it sounds to good to be true then it probably is. As I have said many times before, Pollan’s plan to feed the world would fall woefully short. It’s easy to be a farmer when you are writing a book, but it’s a much different story when you have 9 billion people looking to you to supply them with life-sustaining food. The worst part is that Pollan knows better but his quest to sell books has overwritten the things I taught him several years ago. He continues to sensationalize his story for his own personal gain.

Pacelle Says Go Veg To Save Planet

Ignoring the Cow in the Room
By Wayne Pacelle, CEO of HSUS, 7/30/09

Washington Post writer Ezra Klein has a large following of readers interested in his take on politics. The Economist even named him one of the “minds of the moment.” But it’s his views on animal agriculture’s substantial contribution to the climate change problem that caught my attention this week. I’ve blogged about the issue, and The HSUS even has an advertising campaign on the subject, but it’s still a matter far removed from the thoughts of most policy makers and even many environmental organizations.

In a Washington Post print edition column published yesterday, Klein reminds readers, or in many respects provides primary information to readers, about the connection between our societal demand for meat, egg, and dairy products and climate change. He notes that if we’re really concerned about climate change, “there's no reason to ignore the impact of what we put on our plates.” And, like The HSUS, he doesn’t demand all or nothing. Klein makes it clear: “Going vegetarian might not be as effective as going vegan, but it's better than eating meat, and eating meat less is better than eating meat more.”

If you want to take action on a personal level, there’s no better way to get engaged than to eat lower on the food chain, at least on a periodic basis. And as a matter of policy, we can no longer give a free pass to animal agribusiness if we are going to take a comprehensive look at the climate change problem.

For free recipes to get you started on trying meatless meals once in awhile or with whatever frequency you choose, check out www.humanesociety.org/recipes. Link

Yesterday I highlighted the misinformation that was included in an article which was advocating for eating less meat in order to halt global warming. Well, Wayne Pacelle didn’t miss this chance to forward on an article that was advocating vegetarianism. So even though he continues to say they aren’t advocating for the end of animal agriculture, their actions, and his blog, continue to say otherwise. Regardless of what he says where, there is no doubt that the Humane Society of the United States and Wayne Pacelle are trying to put family livestock operations out of business.

Consumer Survey

Consumers Positive Toward Farmers
By Pork news staff Thursday, July 30, 2009

There’s more insight on what consumers think about America’s farmers thanks to a survey of consumer views on U.S. agriculture conducted with funding from the United Soybean Board and soybean checkoff. Called the 2009 National Agricultural Image Survey, the study took place in February and surveyed a random sample of 1,000 registered voters with characteristics representative of the U.S. population. The results provide insights into seven main issues, including: the image of U.S. poultry and livestock producers a farmer attribute analysis and consumer attitudes on confinement livestock production, food prices, ag-related legislation, biobased products and biodiesel.

Some of the study’s key findings include:

Individuals who are somewhat or very favorable toward U.S. poultry and livestock producers rose from 69 percent in 2008 to 78 percent in 2009.

Top positive farmer attributes among consumers are that farm families know about protecting air and water quality and that most farmers take good care of their animals.

Nearly 90 percent of consumers do not see farmers as a major reason for increases in retail food prices.

Most consumers agree that it is important to subsidize farmers to ensure that there is a safe food supply.

After hearing that anti-confinement legislation could force Americans to get their milk, eggs and meat from foreign producers, 78 percent of consumers are against the legislation.

Consumers see energy security as the most important benefit of biobased products.

“It was great to see from the 2009 agricultural survey that overall, consumers have a very positive attitude toward agriculture,” says Vanessa Kummer, a USB director and soybean farmer from Colfax, N.D. “The survey is an important tool that helps USB develop effective messages to promote soy-based, environmentally safe products and the importance of maintaining animal agriculture.” Link

Survey after survey continues to show that consumers appreciate farmers and ranchers when they are supplied with accurate information to make an informed decision. This should reinforce to everyone why it’s so important for farmers and ranchers to talk to consumers and tell your story. You can have a great impact, one that will really benefit your industry.


Advocates for Agriculture

I’m dozing, as I often do on airplanes, but the guy behind me has been broadcasting nonstop for nearly three hours. I finally admit defeat and start some serious eavesdropping. He’s talking about food, damning farming, particularly livestock farming, compensating for his lack of knowledge with volume.

I’m so tired of people who wouldn’t visit a doctor who used a stethoscope instead of an MRI demanding that farmers like me use 1930s technology to raise food. Farming has always been messy and painful, and bloody and dirty. It still is.

But now we have to listen to self-appointed experts on airplanes frightening their seatmates about the profession I have practiced for more than 30 years. I’d had enough. I turned around and politely told the lecturer that he ought not believe everything he reads. He quieted and asked me what kind of farming I do. I told him, and when he asked if I used organic farming, I said no, and left it at that. I didn’t answer with the first thought that came to mind, which is simply this: I deal in the real world, not superstitions, and unless the consumer absolutely forces my hand, I am about as likely to adopt organic methods as the Wall Street Journal is to publish their next edition by setting the type by hand.

Young turkeys aren't smart enough to come in out of the rain, and will stand outside in a downpour, with beaks open and eyes skyward, until they drown.

He was a businessman, and I’m sure spends his days with spreadsheets, projections, and marketing studies. He hasn’t used a slide rule in his career and wouldn’t make projections with tea leaves or soothsayers. He does not blame witchcraft for a bad quarter, or expect the factory that makes his product to use steam power instead of electricity, or horses and wagons to deliver his products instead of trucks and trains. But he expects me to farm like my grandfather, and not incidentally, I suppose, to live like him as well. He thinks farmers are too stupid to farm sustainably, too cruel to treat their animals well, and too careless to worry about their communities, their health, and their families. I would not presume to criticize his car, or the size of his house, or the way he runs his business. But he is an expert about me, on the strength of one book, and is sharing that expertise with captive audiences every time he gets the chance. Enough, enough, enough. Read More

So many people that I talk to that have read Pollan’s books continue to tell me that his ideas sound very reasonable. But as the old saying goes, if it sounds to good to be true then it probably is. As I have said many times before, Pollan’s plan to feed the world would fall woefully short. It’s easy to be a farmer when you are writing a book, but it’s a much different story when you have 9 billion people looking to you to supply them with life-sustaining food. The worst part is that Pollan knows better but his quest to sell books has overwritten the things I taught him several years ago. He continues to sensationalize his story for his own personal gain.

Pacelle Says Go Veg To Save Planet

Ignoring the Cow in the Room
By Wayne Pacelle, CEO of HSUS, 7/30/09

Washington Post writer Ezra Klein has a large following of readers interested in his take on politics. The Economist even named him one of the “minds of the moment.” But it’s his views on animal agriculture’s substantial contribution to the climate change problem that caught my attention this week. I’ve blogged about the issue, and The HSUS even has an advertising campaign on the subject, but it’s still a matter far removed from the thoughts of most policy makers and even many environmental organizations.

In a Washington Post print edition column published yesterday, Klein reminds readers, or in many respects provides primary information to readers, about the connection between our societal demand for meat, egg, and dairy products and climate change. He notes that if we’re really concerned about climate change, “there's no reason to ignore the impact of what we put on our plates.” And, like The HSUS, he doesn’t demand all or nothing. Klein makes it clear: “Going vegetarian might not be as effective as going vegan, but it's better than eating meat, and eating meat less is better than eating meat more.”

If you want to take action on a personal level, there’s no better way to get engaged than to eat lower on the food chain, at least on a periodic basis. And as a matter of policy, we can no longer give a free pass to animal agribusiness if we are going to take a comprehensive look at the climate change problem.

For free recipes to get you started on trying meatless meals once in awhile or with whatever frequency you choose, check out www.humanesociety.org/recipes. Link

Yesterday I highlighted the misinformation that was included in an article which was advocating for eating less meat in order to halt global warming. Well, Wayne Pacelle didn’t miss this chance to forward on an article that was advocating vegetarianism. So even though he continues to say they aren’t advocating for the end of animal agriculture, their actions, and his blog, continue to say otherwise. Regardless of what he says where, there is no doubt that the Humane Society of the United States and Wayne Pacelle are trying to put family livestock operations out of business.

Consumer Survey

Consumers Positive Toward Farmers
By Pork news staff Thursday, July 30, 2009

There’s more insight on what consumers think about America’s farmers thanks to a survey of consumer views on U.S. agriculture conducted with funding from the United Soybean Board and soybean checkoff. Called the 2009 National Agricultural Image Survey, the study took place in February and surveyed a random sample of 1,000 registered voters with characteristics representative of the U.S. population. The results provide insights into seven main issues, including: the image of U.S. poultry and livestock producers a farmer attribute analysis and consumer attitudes on confinement livestock production, food prices, ag-related legislation, biobased products and biodiesel.

Some of the study’s key findings include:

Individuals who are somewhat or very favorable toward U.S. poultry and livestock producers rose from 69 percent in 2008 to 78 percent in 2009.

Top positive farmer attributes among consumers are that farm families know about protecting air and water quality and that most farmers take good care of their animals.

Nearly 90 percent of consumers do not see farmers as a major reason for increases in retail food prices.

Most consumers agree that it is important to subsidize farmers to ensure that there is a safe food supply.

After hearing that anti-confinement legislation could force Americans to get their milk, eggs and meat from foreign producers, 78 percent of consumers are against the legislation.

Consumers see energy security as the most important benefit of biobased products.

“It was great to see from the 2009 agricultural survey that overall, consumers have a very positive attitude toward agriculture,” says Vanessa Kummer, a USB director and soybean farmer from Colfax, N.D. “The survey is an important tool that helps USB develop effective messages to promote soy-based, environmentally safe products and the importance of maintaining animal agriculture.” Link

Survey after survey continues to show that consumers appreciate farmers and ranchers when they are supplied with accurate information to make an informed decision. This should reinforce to everyone why it’s so important for farmers and ranchers to talk to consumers and tell your story. You can have a great impact, one that will really benefit your industry.


Advocates for Agriculture

I’m dozing, as I often do on airplanes, but the guy behind me has been broadcasting nonstop for nearly three hours. I finally admit defeat and start some serious eavesdropping. He’s talking about food, damning farming, particularly livestock farming, compensating for his lack of knowledge with volume.

I’m so tired of people who wouldn’t visit a doctor who used a stethoscope instead of an MRI demanding that farmers like me use 1930s technology to raise food. Farming has always been messy and painful, and bloody and dirty. It still is.

But now we have to listen to self-appointed experts on airplanes frightening their seatmates about the profession I have practiced for more than 30 years. I’d had enough. I turned around and politely told the lecturer that he ought not believe everything he reads. He quieted and asked me what kind of farming I do. I told him, and when he asked if I used organic farming, I said no, and left it at that. I didn’t answer with the first thought that came to mind, which is simply this: I deal in the real world, not superstitions, and unless the consumer absolutely forces my hand, I am about as likely to adopt organic methods as the Wall Street Journal is to publish their next edition by setting the type by hand.

Young turkeys aren't smart enough to come in out of the rain, and will stand outside in a downpour, with beaks open and eyes skyward, until they drown.

He was a businessman, and I’m sure spends his days with spreadsheets, projections, and marketing studies. He hasn’t used a slide rule in his career and wouldn’t make projections with tea leaves or soothsayers. He does not blame witchcraft for a bad quarter, or expect the factory that makes his product to use steam power instead of electricity, or horses and wagons to deliver his products instead of trucks and trains. But he expects me to farm like my grandfather, and not incidentally, I suppose, to live like him as well. He thinks farmers are too stupid to farm sustainably, too cruel to treat their animals well, and too careless to worry about their communities, their health, and their families. I would not presume to criticize his car, or the size of his house, or the way he runs his business. But he is an expert about me, on the strength of one book, and is sharing that expertise with captive audiences every time he gets the chance. Enough, enough, enough. Read More

So many people that I talk to that have read Pollan’s books continue to tell me that his ideas sound very reasonable. But as the old saying goes, if it sounds to good to be true then it probably is. As I have said many times before, Pollan’s plan to feed the world would fall woefully short. It’s easy to be a farmer when you are writing a book, but it’s a much different story when you have 9 billion people looking to you to supply them with life-sustaining food. The worst part is that Pollan knows better but his quest to sell books has overwritten the things I taught him several years ago. He continues to sensationalize his story for his own personal gain.

Pacelle Says Go Veg To Save Planet

Ignoring the Cow in the Room
By Wayne Pacelle, CEO of HSUS, 7/30/09

Washington Post writer Ezra Klein has a large following of readers interested in his take on politics. The Economist even named him one of the “minds of the moment.” But it’s his views on animal agriculture’s substantial contribution to the climate change problem that caught my attention this week. I’ve blogged about the issue, and The HSUS even has an advertising campaign on the subject, but it’s still a matter far removed from the thoughts of most policy makers and even many environmental organizations.

In a Washington Post print edition column published yesterday, Klein reminds readers, or in many respects provides primary information to readers, about the connection between our societal demand for meat, egg, and dairy products and climate change. He notes that if we’re really concerned about climate change, “there's no reason to ignore the impact of what we put on our plates.” And, like The HSUS, he doesn’t demand all or nothing. Klein makes it clear: “Going vegetarian might not be as effective as going vegan, but it's better than eating meat, and eating meat less is better than eating meat more.”

If you want to take action on a personal level, there’s no better way to get engaged than to eat lower on the food chain, at least on a periodic basis. And as a matter of policy, we can no longer give a free pass to animal agribusiness if we are going to take a comprehensive look at the climate change problem.

For free recipes to get you started on trying meatless meals once in awhile or with whatever frequency you choose, check out www.humanesociety.org/recipes. Link

Yesterday I highlighted the misinformation that was included in an article which was advocating for eating less meat in order to halt global warming. Well, Wayne Pacelle didn’t miss this chance to forward on an article that was advocating vegetarianism. So even though he continues to say they aren’t advocating for the end of animal agriculture, their actions, and his blog, continue to say otherwise. Regardless of what he says where, there is no doubt that the Humane Society of the United States and Wayne Pacelle are trying to put family livestock operations out of business.

Consumer Survey

Consumers Positive Toward Farmers
By Pork news staff Thursday, July 30, 2009

There’s more insight on what consumers think about America’s farmers thanks to a survey of consumer views on U.S. agriculture conducted with funding from the United Soybean Board and soybean checkoff. Called the 2009 National Agricultural Image Survey, the study took place in February and surveyed a random sample of 1,000 registered voters with characteristics representative of the U.S. population. The results provide insights into seven main issues, including: the image of U.S. poultry and livestock producers a farmer attribute analysis and consumer attitudes on confinement livestock production, food prices, ag-related legislation, biobased products and biodiesel.

Some of the study’s key findings include:

Individuals who are somewhat or very favorable toward U.S. poultry and livestock producers rose from 69 percent in 2008 to 78 percent in 2009.

Top positive farmer attributes among consumers are that farm families know about protecting air and water quality and that most farmers take good care of their animals.

Nearly 90 percent of consumers do not see farmers as a major reason for increases in retail food prices.

Most consumers agree that it is important to subsidize farmers to ensure that there is a safe food supply.

After hearing that anti-confinement legislation could force Americans to get their milk, eggs and meat from foreign producers, 78 percent of consumers are against the legislation.

Consumers see energy security as the most important benefit of biobased products.

“It was great to see from the 2009 agricultural survey that overall, consumers have a very positive attitude toward agriculture,” says Vanessa Kummer, a USB director and soybean farmer from Colfax, N.D. “The survey is an important tool that helps USB develop effective messages to promote soy-based, environmentally safe products and the importance of maintaining animal agriculture.” Link

Survey after survey continues to show that consumers appreciate farmers and ranchers when they are supplied with accurate information to make an informed decision. This should reinforce to everyone why it’s so important for farmers and ranchers to talk to consumers and tell your story. You can have a great impact, one that will really benefit your industry.


Advocates for Agriculture

I’m dozing, as I often do on airplanes, but the guy behind me has been broadcasting nonstop for nearly three hours. I finally admit defeat and start some serious eavesdropping. He’s talking about food, damning farming, particularly livestock farming, compensating for his lack of knowledge with volume.

I’m so tired of people who wouldn’t visit a doctor who used a stethoscope instead of an MRI demanding that farmers like me use 1930s technology to raise food. Farming has always been messy and painful, and bloody and dirty. It still is.

But now we have to listen to self-appointed experts on airplanes frightening their seatmates about the profession I have practiced for more than 30 years. I’d had enough. I turned around and politely told the lecturer that he ought not believe everything he reads. He quieted and asked me what kind of farming I do. I told him, and when he asked if I used organic farming, I said no, and left it at that. I didn’t answer with the first thought that came to mind, which is simply this: I deal in the real world, not superstitions, and unless the consumer absolutely forces my hand, I am about as likely to adopt organic methods as the Wall Street Journal is to publish their next edition by setting the type by hand.

Young turkeys aren't smart enough to come in out of the rain, and will stand outside in a downpour, with beaks open and eyes skyward, until they drown.

He was a businessman, and I’m sure spends his days with spreadsheets, projections, and marketing studies. He hasn’t used a slide rule in his career and wouldn’t make projections with tea leaves or soothsayers. He does not blame witchcraft for a bad quarter, or expect the factory that makes his product to use steam power instead of electricity, or horses and wagons to deliver his products instead of trucks and trains. But he expects me to farm like my grandfather, and not incidentally, I suppose, to live like him as well. He thinks farmers are too stupid to farm sustainably, too cruel to treat their animals well, and too careless to worry about their communities, their health, and their families. I would not presume to criticize his car, or the size of his house, or the way he runs his business. But he is an expert about me, on the strength of one book, and is sharing that expertise with captive audiences every time he gets the chance. Enough, enough, enough. Read More

So many people that I talk to that have read Pollan’s books continue to tell me that his ideas sound very reasonable. But as the old saying goes, if it sounds to good to be true then it probably is. As I have said many times before, Pollan’s plan to feed the world would fall woefully short. It’s easy to be a farmer when you are writing a book, but it’s a much different story when you have 9 billion people looking to you to supply them with life-sustaining food. The worst part is that Pollan knows better but his quest to sell books has overwritten the things I taught him several years ago. He continues to sensationalize his story for his own personal gain.

Pacelle Says Go Veg To Save Planet

Ignoring the Cow in the Room
By Wayne Pacelle, CEO of HSUS, 7/30/09

Washington Post writer Ezra Klein has a large following of readers interested in his take on politics. The Economist even named him one of the “minds of the moment.” But it’s his views on animal agriculture’s substantial contribution to the climate change problem that caught my attention this week. I’ve blogged about the issue, and The HSUS even has an advertising campaign on the subject, but it’s still a matter far removed from the thoughts of most policy makers and even many environmental organizations.

In a Washington Post print edition column published yesterday, Klein reminds readers, or in many respects provides primary information to readers, about the connection between our societal demand for meat, egg, and dairy products and climate change. He notes that if we’re really concerned about climate change, “there's no reason to ignore the impact of what we put on our plates.” And, like The HSUS, he doesn’t demand all or nothing. Klein makes it clear: “Going vegetarian might not be as effective as going vegan, but it's better than eating meat, and eating meat less is better than eating meat more.”

If you want to take action on a personal level, there’s no better way to get engaged than to eat lower on the food chain, at least on a periodic basis. And as a matter of policy, we can no longer give a free pass to animal agribusiness if we are going to take a comprehensive look at the climate change problem.

For free recipes to get you started on trying meatless meals once in awhile or with whatever frequency you choose, check out www.humanesociety.org/recipes. Link

Yesterday I highlighted the misinformation that was included in an article which was advocating for eating less meat in order to halt global warming. Well, Wayne Pacelle didn’t miss this chance to forward on an article that was advocating vegetarianism. So even though he continues to say they aren’t advocating for the end of animal agriculture, their actions, and his blog, continue to say otherwise. Regardless of what he says where, there is no doubt that the Humane Society of the United States and Wayne Pacelle are trying to put family livestock operations out of business.

Consumer Survey

Consumers Positive Toward Farmers
By Pork news staff Thursday, July 30, 2009

There’s more insight on what consumers think about America’s farmers thanks to a survey of consumer views on U.S. agriculture conducted with funding from the United Soybean Board and soybean checkoff. Called the 2009 National Agricultural Image Survey, the study took place in February and surveyed a random sample of 1,000 registered voters with characteristics representative of the U.S. population. The results provide insights into seven main issues, including: the image of U.S. poultry and livestock producers a farmer attribute analysis and consumer attitudes on confinement livestock production, food prices, ag-related legislation, biobased products and biodiesel.

Some of the study’s key findings include:

Individuals who are somewhat or very favorable toward U.S. poultry and livestock producers rose from 69 percent in 2008 to 78 percent in 2009.

Top positive farmer attributes among consumers are that farm families know about protecting air and water quality and that most farmers take good care of their animals.

Nearly 90 percent of consumers do not see farmers as a major reason for increases in retail food prices.

Most consumers agree that it is important to subsidize farmers to ensure that there is a safe food supply.

After hearing that anti-confinement legislation could force Americans to get their milk, eggs and meat from foreign producers, 78 percent of consumers are against the legislation.

Consumers see energy security as the most important benefit of biobased products.

“It was great to see from the 2009 agricultural survey that overall, consumers have a very positive attitude toward agriculture,” says Vanessa Kummer, a USB director and soybean farmer from Colfax, N.D. “The survey is an important tool that helps USB develop effective messages to promote soy-based, environmentally safe products and the importance of maintaining animal agriculture.” Link

Survey after survey continues to show that consumers appreciate farmers and ranchers when they are supplied with accurate information to make an informed decision. This should reinforce to everyone why it’s so important for farmers and ranchers to talk to consumers and tell your story. You can have a great impact, one that will really benefit your industry.


Advocates for Agriculture

I’m dozing, as I often do on airplanes, but the guy behind me has been broadcasting nonstop for nearly three hours. I finally admit defeat and start some serious eavesdropping. He’s talking about food, damning farming, particularly livestock farming, compensating for his lack of knowledge with volume.

I’m so tired of people who wouldn’t visit a doctor who used a stethoscope instead of an MRI demanding that farmers like me use 1930s technology to raise food. Farming has always been messy and painful, and bloody and dirty. It still is.

But now we have to listen to self-appointed experts on airplanes frightening their seatmates about the profession I have practiced for more than 30 years. I’d had enough. I turned around and politely told the lecturer that he ought not believe everything he reads. He quieted and asked me what kind of farming I do. I told him, and when he asked if I used organic farming, I said no, and left it at that. I didn’t answer with the first thought that came to mind, which is simply this: I deal in the real world, not superstitions, and unless the consumer absolutely forces my hand, I am about as likely to adopt organic methods as the Wall Street Journal is to publish their next edition by setting the type by hand.

Young turkeys aren't smart enough to come in out of the rain, and will stand outside in a downpour, with beaks open and eyes skyward, until they drown.

He was a businessman, and I’m sure spends his days with spreadsheets, projections, and marketing studies. He hasn’t used a slide rule in his career and wouldn’t make projections with tea leaves or soothsayers. He does not blame witchcraft for a bad quarter, or expect the factory that makes his product to use steam power instead of electricity, or horses and wagons to deliver his products instead of trucks and trains. But he expects me to farm like my grandfather, and not incidentally, I suppose, to live like him as well. He thinks farmers are too stupid to farm sustainably, too cruel to treat their animals well, and too careless to worry about their communities, their health, and their families. I would not presume to criticize his car, or the size of his house, or the way he runs his business. But he is an expert about me, on the strength of one book, and is sharing that expertise with captive audiences every time he gets the chance. Enough, enough, enough. Read More

So many people that I talk to that have read Pollan’s books continue to tell me that his ideas sound very reasonable. But as the old saying goes, if it sounds to good to be true then it probably is. As I have said many times before, Pollan’s plan to feed the world would fall woefully short. It’s easy to be a farmer when you are writing a book, but it’s a much different story when you have 9 billion people looking to you to supply them with life-sustaining food. The worst part is that Pollan knows better but his quest to sell books has overwritten the things I taught him several years ago. He continues to sensationalize his story for his own personal gain.

Pacelle Says Go Veg To Save Planet

Ignoring the Cow in the Room
By Wayne Pacelle, CEO of HSUS, 7/30/09

Washington Post writer Ezra Klein has a large following of readers interested in his take on politics. The Economist even named him one of the “minds of the moment.” But it’s his views on animal agriculture’s substantial contribution to the climate change problem that caught my attention this week. I’ve blogged about the issue, and The HSUS even has an advertising campaign on the subject, but it’s still a matter far removed from the thoughts of most policy makers and even many environmental organizations.

In a Washington Post print edition column published yesterday, Klein reminds readers, or in many respects provides primary information to readers, about the connection between our societal demand for meat, egg, and dairy products and climate change. He notes that if we’re really concerned about climate change, “there's no reason to ignore the impact of what we put on our plates.” And, like The HSUS, he doesn’t demand all or nothing. Klein makes it clear: “Going vegetarian might not be as effective as going vegan, but it's better than eating meat, and eating meat less is better than eating meat more.”

If you want to take action on a personal level, there’s no better way to get engaged than to eat lower on the food chain, at least on a periodic basis. And as a matter of policy, we can no longer give a free pass to animal agribusiness if we are going to take a comprehensive look at the climate change problem.

For free recipes to get you started on trying meatless meals once in awhile or with whatever frequency you choose, check out www.humanesociety.org/recipes. Link

Yesterday I highlighted the misinformation that was included in an article which was advocating for eating less meat in order to halt global warming. Well, Wayne Pacelle didn’t miss this chance to forward on an article that was advocating vegetarianism. So even though he continues to say they aren’t advocating for the end of animal agriculture, their actions, and his blog, continue to say otherwise. Regardless of what he says where, there is no doubt that the Humane Society of the United States and Wayne Pacelle are trying to put family livestock operations out of business.

Consumer Survey

Consumers Positive Toward Farmers
By Pork news staff Thursday, July 30, 2009

There’s more insight on what consumers think about America’s farmers thanks to a survey of consumer views on U.S. agriculture conducted with funding from the United Soybean Board and soybean checkoff. Called the 2009 National Agricultural Image Survey, the study took place in February and surveyed a random sample of 1,000 registered voters with characteristics representative of the U.S. population. The results provide insights into seven main issues, including: the image of U.S. poultry and livestock producers a farmer attribute analysis and consumer attitudes on confinement livestock production, food prices, ag-related legislation, biobased products and biodiesel.

Some of the study’s key findings include:

Individuals who are somewhat or very favorable toward U.S. poultry and livestock producers rose from 69 percent in 2008 to 78 percent in 2009.

Top positive farmer attributes among consumers are that farm families know about protecting air and water quality and that most farmers take good care of their animals.

Nearly 90 percent of consumers do not see farmers as a major reason for increases in retail food prices.

Most consumers agree that it is important to subsidize farmers to ensure that there is a safe food supply.

After hearing that anti-confinement legislation could force Americans to get their milk, eggs and meat from foreign producers, 78 percent of consumers are against the legislation.

Consumers see energy security as the most important benefit of biobased products.

“It was great to see from the 2009 agricultural survey that overall, consumers have a very positive attitude toward agriculture,” says Vanessa Kummer, a USB director and soybean farmer from Colfax, N.D. “The survey is an important tool that helps USB develop effective messages to promote soy-based, environmentally safe products and the importance of maintaining animal agriculture.” Link

Survey after survey continues to show that consumers appreciate farmers and ranchers when they are supplied with accurate information to make an informed decision. This should reinforce to everyone why it’s so important for farmers and ranchers to talk to consumers and tell your story. You can have a great impact, one that will really benefit your industry.


Advocates for Agriculture

I’m dozing, as I often do on airplanes, but the guy behind me has been broadcasting nonstop for nearly three hours. I finally admit defeat and start some serious eavesdropping. He’s talking about food, damning farming, particularly livestock farming, compensating for his lack of knowledge with volume.

I’m so tired of people who wouldn’t visit a doctor who used a stethoscope instead of an MRI demanding that farmers like me use 1930s technology to raise food. Farming has always been messy and painful, and bloody and dirty. It still is.

But now we have to listen to self-appointed experts on airplanes frightening their seatmates about the profession I have practiced for more than 30 years. I’d had enough. I turned around and politely told the lecturer that he ought not believe everything he reads. He quieted and asked me what kind of farming I do. I told him, and when he asked if I used organic farming, I said no, and left it at that. I didn’t answer with the first thought that came to mind, which is simply this: I deal in the real world, not superstitions, and unless the consumer absolutely forces my hand, I am about as likely to adopt organic methods as the Wall Street Journal is to publish their next edition by setting the type by hand.

Young turkeys aren't smart enough to come in out of the rain, and will stand outside in a downpour, with beaks open and eyes skyward, until they drown.

He was a businessman, and I’m sure spends his days with spreadsheets, projections, and marketing studies. He hasn’t used a slide rule in his career and wouldn’t make projections with tea leaves or soothsayers. He does not blame witchcraft for a bad quarter, or expect the factory that makes his product to use steam power instead of electricity, or horses and wagons to deliver his products instead of trucks and trains. But he expects me to farm like my grandfather, and not incidentally, I suppose, to live like him as well. He thinks farmers are too stupid to farm sustainably, too cruel to treat their animals well, and too careless to worry about their communities, their health, and their families. I would not presume to criticize his car, or the size of his house, or the way he runs his business. But he is an expert about me, on the strength of one book, and is sharing that expertise with captive audiences every time he gets the chance. Enough, enough, enough. Read More

So many people that I talk to that have read Pollan’s books continue to tell me that his ideas sound very reasonable. But as the old saying goes, if it sounds to good to be true then it probably is. As I have said many times before, Pollan’s plan to feed the world would fall woefully short. It’s easy to be a farmer when you are writing a book, but it’s a much different story when you have 9 billion people looking to you to supply them with life-sustaining food. The worst part is that Pollan knows better but his quest to sell books has overwritten the things I taught him several years ago. He continues to sensationalize his story for his own personal gain.

Pacelle Says Go Veg To Save Planet

Ignoring the Cow in the Room
By Wayne Pacelle, CEO of HSUS, 7/30/09

Washington Post writer Ezra Klein has a large following of readers interested in his take on politics. The Economist even named him one of the “minds of the moment.” But it’s his views on animal agriculture’s substantial contribution to the climate change problem that caught my attention this week. I’ve blogged about the issue, and The HSUS even has an advertising campaign on the subject, but it’s still a matter far removed from the thoughts of most policy makers and even many environmental organizations.

In a Washington Post print edition column published yesterday, Klein reminds readers, or in many respects provides primary information to readers, about the connection between our societal demand for meat, egg, and dairy products and climate change. He notes that if we’re really concerned about climate change, “there's no reason to ignore the impact of what we put on our plates.” And, like The HSUS, he doesn’t demand all or nothing. Klein makes it clear: “Going vegetarian might not be as effective as going vegan, but it's better than eating meat, and eating meat less is better than eating meat more.”

If you want to take action on a personal level, there’s no better way to get engaged than to eat lower on the food chain, at least on a periodic basis. And as a matter of policy, we can no longer give a free pass to animal agribusiness if we are going to take a comprehensive look at the climate change problem.

For free recipes to get you started on trying meatless meals once in awhile or with whatever frequency you choose, check out www.humanesociety.org/recipes. Link

Yesterday I highlighted the misinformation that was included in an article which was advocating for eating less meat in order to halt global warming. Well, Wayne Pacelle didn’t miss this chance to forward on an article that was advocating vegetarianism. So even though he continues to say they aren’t advocating for the end of animal agriculture, their actions, and his blog, continue to say otherwise. Regardless of what he says where, there is no doubt that the Humane Society of the United States and Wayne Pacelle are trying to put family livestock operations out of business.

Consumer Survey

Consumers Positive Toward Farmers
By Pork news staff Thursday, July 30, 2009

There’s more insight on what consumers think about America’s farmers thanks to a survey of consumer views on U.S. agriculture conducted with funding from the United Soybean Board and soybean checkoff. Called the 2009 National Agricultural Image Survey, the study took place in February and surveyed a random sample of 1,000 registered voters with characteristics representative of the U.S. population. The results provide insights into seven main issues, including: the image of U.S. poultry and livestock producers a farmer attribute analysis and consumer attitudes on confinement livestock production, food prices, ag-related legislation, biobased products and biodiesel.

Some of the study’s key findings include:

Individuals who are somewhat or very favorable toward U.S. poultry and livestock producers rose from 69 percent in 2008 to 78 percent in 2009.

Top positive farmer attributes among consumers are that farm families know about protecting air and water quality and that most farmers take good care of their animals.

Nearly 90 percent of consumers do not see farmers as a major reason for increases in retail food prices.

Most consumers agree that it is important to subsidize farmers to ensure that there is a safe food supply.

After hearing that anti-confinement legislation could force Americans to get their milk, eggs and meat from foreign producers, 78 percent of consumers are against the legislation.

Consumers see energy security as the most important benefit of biobased products.

“It was great to see from the 2009 agricultural survey that overall, consumers have a very positive attitude toward agriculture,” says Vanessa Kummer, a USB director and soybean farmer from Colfax, N.D. “The survey is an important tool that helps USB develop effective messages to promote soy-based, environmentally safe products and the importance of maintaining animal agriculture.” Link

Survey after survey continues to show that consumers appreciate farmers and ranchers when they are supplied with accurate information to make an informed decision. This should reinforce to everyone why it’s so important for farmers and ranchers to talk to consumers and tell your story. You can have a great impact, one that will really benefit your industry.


Advocates for Agriculture

I’m dozing, as I often do on airplanes, but the guy behind me has been broadcasting nonstop for nearly three hours. I finally admit defeat and start some serious eavesdropping. He’s talking about food, damning farming, particularly livestock farming, compensating for his lack of knowledge with volume.

I’m so tired of people who wouldn’t visit a doctor who used a stethoscope instead of an MRI demanding that farmers like me use 1930s technology to raise food. Farming has always been messy and painful, and bloody and dirty. It still is.

But now we have to listen to self-appointed experts on airplanes frightening their seatmates about the profession I have practiced for more than 30 years. I’d had enough. I turned around and politely told the lecturer that he ought not believe everything he reads. He quieted and asked me what kind of farming I do. I told him, and when he asked if I used organic farming, I said no, and left it at that. I didn’t answer with the first thought that came to mind, which is simply this: I deal in the real world, not superstitions, and unless the consumer absolutely forces my hand, I am about as likely to adopt organic methods as the Wall Street Journal is to publish their next edition by setting the type by hand.

Young turkeys aren't smart enough to come in out of the rain, and will stand outside in a downpour, with beaks open and eyes skyward, until they drown.

He was a businessman, and I’m sure spends his days with spreadsheets, projections, and marketing studies. He hasn’t used a slide rule in his career and wouldn’t make projections with tea leaves or soothsayers. He does not blame witchcraft for a bad quarter, or expect the factory that makes his product to use steam power instead of electricity, or horses and wagons to deliver his products instead of trucks and trains. But he expects me to farm like my grandfather, and not incidentally, I suppose, to live like him as well. He thinks farmers are too stupid to farm sustainably, too cruel to treat their animals well, and too careless to worry about their communities, their health, and their families. I would not presume to criticize his car, or the size of his house, or the way he runs his business. But he is an expert about me, on the strength of one book, and is sharing that expertise with captive audiences every time he gets the chance. Enough, enough, enough. Read More

So many people that I talk to that have read Pollan’s books continue to tell me that his ideas sound very reasonable. But as the old saying goes, if it sounds to good to be true then it probably is. As I have said many times before, Pollan’s plan to feed the world would fall woefully short. It’s easy to be a farmer when you are writing a book, but it’s a much different story when you have 9 billion people looking to you to supply them with life-sustaining food. The worst part is that Pollan knows better but his quest to sell books has overwritten the things I taught him several years ago. He continues to sensationalize his story for his own personal gain.

Pacelle Says Go Veg To Save Planet

Ignoring the Cow in the Room
By Wayne Pacelle, CEO of HSUS, 7/30/09

Washington Post writer Ezra Klein has a large following of readers interested in his take on politics. The Economist even named him one of the “minds of the moment.” But it’s his views on animal agriculture’s substantial contribution to the climate change problem that caught my attention this week. I’ve blogged about the issue, and The HSUS even has an advertising campaign on the subject, but it’s still a matter far removed from the thoughts of most policy makers and even many environmental organizations.

In a Washington Post print edition column published yesterday, Klein reminds readers, or in many respects provides primary information to readers, about the connection between our societal demand for meat, egg, and dairy products and climate change. He notes that if we’re really concerned about climate change, “there's no reason to ignore the impact of what we put on our plates.” And, like The HSUS, he doesn’t demand all or nothing. Klein makes it clear: “Going vegetarian might not be as effective as going vegan, but it's better than eating meat, and eating meat less is better than eating meat more.”

If you want to take action on a personal level, there’s no better way to get engaged than to eat lower on the food chain, at least on a periodic basis. And as a matter of policy, we can no longer give a free pass to animal agribusiness if we are going to take a comprehensive look at the climate change problem.

For free recipes to get you started on trying meatless meals once in awhile or with whatever frequency you choose, check out www.humanesociety.org/recipes. Link

Yesterday I highlighted the misinformation that was included in an article which was advocating for eating less meat in order to halt global warming. Well, Wayne Pacelle didn’t miss this chance to forward on an article that was advocating vegetarianism. So even though he continues to say they aren’t advocating for the end of animal agriculture, their actions, and his blog, continue to say otherwise. Regardless of what he says where, there is no doubt that the Humane Society of the United States and Wayne Pacelle are trying to put family livestock operations out of business.

Consumer Survey

Consumers Positive Toward Farmers
By Pork news staff Thursday, July 30, 2009

There’s more insight on what consumers think about America’s farmers thanks to a survey of consumer views on U.S. agriculture conducted with funding from the United Soybean Board and soybean checkoff. Called the 2009 National Agricultural Image Survey, the study took place in February and surveyed a random sample of 1,000 registered voters with characteristics representative of the U.S. population. The results provide insights into seven main issues, including: the image of U.S. poultry and livestock producers a farmer attribute analysis and consumer attitudes on confinement livestock production, food prices, ag-related legislation, biobased products and biodiesel.

Some of the study’s key findings include:

Individuals who are somewhat or very favorable toward U.S. poultry and livestock producers rose from 69 percent in 2008 to 78 percent in 2009.

Top positive farmer attributes among consumers are that farm families know about protecting air and water quality and that most farmers take good care of their animals.

Nearly 90 percent of consumers do not see farmers as a major reason for increases in retail food prices.

Most consumers agree that it is important to subsidize farmers to ensure that there is a safe food supply.

After hearing that anti-confinement legislation could force Americans to get their milk, eggs and meat from foreign producers, 78 percent of consumers are against the legislation.

Consumers see energy security as the most important benefit of biobased products.

“It was great to see from the 2009 agricultural survey that overall, consumers have a very positive attitude toward agriculture,” says Vanessa Kummer, a USB director and soybean farmer from Colfax, N.D. “The survey is an important tool that helps USB develop effective messages to promote soy-based, environmentally safe products and the importance of maintaining animal agriculture.” Link

Survey after survey continues to show that consumers appreciate farmers and ranchers when they are supplied with accurate information to make an informed decision. This should reinforce to everyone why it’s so important for farmers and ranchers to talk to consumers and tell your story. You can have a great impact, one that will really benefit your industry.


Advocates for Agriculture

I’m dozing, as I often do on airplanes, but the guy behind me has been broadcasting nonstop for nearly three hours. I finally admit defeat and start some serious eavesdropping. He’s talking about food, damning farming, particularly livestock farming, compensating for his lack of knowledge with volume.

I’m so tired of people who wouldn’t visit a doctor who used a stethoscope instead of an MRI demanding that farmers like me use 1930s technology to raise food. Farming has always been messy and painful, and bloody and dirty. It still is.

But now we have to listen to self-appointed experts on airplanes frightening their seatmates about the profession I have practiced for more than 30 years. I’d had enough. I turned around and politely told the lecturer that he ought not believe everything he reads. He quieted and asked me what kind of farming I do. I told him, and when he asked if I used organic farming, I said no, and left it at that. I didn’t answer with the first thought that came to mind, which is simply this: I deal in the real world, not superstitions, and unless the consumer absolutely forces my hand, I am about as likely to adopt organic methods as the Wall Street Journal is to publish their next edition by setting the type by hand.

Young turkeys aren't smart enough to come in out of the rain, and will stand outside in a downpour, with beaks open and eyes skyward, until they drown.

He was a businessman, and I’m sure spends his days with spreadsheets, projections, and marketing studies. He hasn’t used a slide rule in his career and wouldn’t make projections with tea leaves or soothsayers. He does not blame witchcraft for a bad quarter, or expect the factory that makes his product to use steam power instead of electricity, or horses and wagons to deliver his products instead of trucks and trains. But he expects me to farm like my grandfather, and not incidentally, I suppose, to live like him as well. He thinks farmers are too stupid to farm sustainably, too cruel to treat their animals well, and too careless to worry about their communities, their health, and their families. I would not presume to criticize his car, or the size of his house, or the way he runs his business. But he is an expert about me, on the strength of one book, and is sharing that expertise with captive audiences every time he gets the chance. Enough, enough, enough. Read More

So many people that I talk to that have read Pollan’s books continue to tell me that his ideas sound very reasonable. But as the old saying goes, if it sounds to good to be true then it probably is. As I have said many times before, Pollan’s plan to feed the world would fall woefully short. It’s easy to be a farmer when you are writing a book, but it’s a much different story when you have 9 billion people looking to you to supply them with life-sustaining food. The worst part is that Pollan knows better but his quest to sell books has overwritten the things I taught him several years ago. He continues to sensationalize his story for his own personal gain.

Pacelle Says Go Veg To Save Planet

Ignoring the Cow in the Room
By Wayne Pacelle, CEO of HSUS, 7/30/09

Washington Post writer Ezra Klein has a large following of readers interested in his take on politics. The Economist even named him one of the “minds of the moment.” But it’s his views on animal agriculture’s substantial contribution to the climate change problem that caught my attention this week. I’ve blogged about the issue, and The HSUS even has an advertising campaign on the subject, but it’s still a matter far removed from the thoughts of most policy makers and even many environmental organizations.

In a Washington Post print edition column published yesterday, Klein reminds readers, or in many respects provides primary information to readers, about the connection between our societal demand for meat, egg, and dairy products and climate change. He notes that if we’re really concerned about climate change, “there's no reason to ignore the impact of what we put on our plates.” And, like The HSUS, he doesn’t demand all or nothing. Klein makes it clear: “Going vegetarian might not be as effective as going vegan, but it's better than eating meat, and eating meat less is better than eating meat more.”

If you want to take action on a personal level, there’s no better way to get engaged than to eat lower on the food chain, at least on a periodic basis. And as a matter of policy, we can no longer give a free pass to animal agribusiness if we are going to take a comprehensive look at the climate change problem.

For free recipes to get you started on trying meatless meals once in awhile or with whatever frequency you choose, check out www.humanesociety.org/recipes. Link

Yesterday I highlighted the misinformation that was included in an article which was advocating for eating less meat in order to halt global warming. Well, Wayne Pacelle didn’t miss this chance to forward on an article that was advocating vegetarianism. So even though he continues to say they aren’t advocating for the end of animal agriculture, their actions, and his blog, continue to say otherwise. Regardless of what he says where, there is no doubt that the Humane Society of the United States and Wayne Pacelle are trying to put family livestock operations out of business.

Consumer Survey

Consumers Positive Toward Farmers
By Pork news staff Thursday, July 30, 2009

There’s more insight on what consumers think about America’s farmers thanks to a survey of consumer views on U.S. agriculture conducted with funding from the United Soybean Board and soybean checkoff. Called the 2009 National Agricultural Image Survey, the study took place in February and surveyed a random sample of 1,000 registered voters with characteristics representative of the U.S. population. The results provide insights into seven main issues, including: the image of U.S. poultry and livestock producers a farmer attribute analysis and consumer attitudes on confinement livestock production, food prices, ag-related legislation, biobased products and biodiesel.

Some of the study’s key findings include:

Individuals who are somewhat or very favorable toward U.S. poultry and livestock producers rose from 69 percent in 2008 to 78 percent in 2009.

Top positive farmer attributes among consumers are that farm families know about protecting air and water quality and that most farmers take good care of their animals.

Nearly 90 percent of consumers do not see farmers as a major reason for increases in retail food prices.

Most consumers agree that it is important to subsidize farmers to ensure that there is a safe food supply.

After hearing that anti-confinement legislation could force Americans to get their milk, eggs and meat from foreign producers, 78 percent of consumers are against the legislation.

Consumers see energy security as the most important benefit of biobased products.

“It was great to see from the 2009 agricultural survey that overall, consumers have a very positive attitude toward agriculture,” says Vanessa Kummer, a USB director and soybean farmer from Colfax, N.D. “The survey is an important tool that helps USB develop effective messages to promote soy-based, environmentally safe products and the importance of maintaining animal agriculture.” Link

Survey after survey continues to show that consumers appreciate farmers and ranchers when they are supplied with accurate information to make an informed decision. This should reinforce to everyone why it’s so important for farmers and ranchers to talk to consumers and tell your story. You can have a great impact, one that will really benefit your industry.


Advocates for Agriculture

I’m dozing, as I often do on airplanes, but the guy behind me has been broadcasting nonstop for nearly three hours. I finally admit defeat and start some serious eavesdropping. He’s talking about food, damning farming, particularly livestock farming, compensating for his lack of knowledge with volume.

I’m so tired of people who wouldn’t visit a doctor who used a stethoscope instead of an MRI demanding that farmers like me use 1930s technology to raise food. Farming has always been messy and painful, and bloody and dirty. It still is.

But now we have to listen to self-appointed experts on airplanes frightening their seatmates about the profession I have practiced for more than 30 years. I’d had enough. I turned around and politely told the lecturer that he ought not believe everything he reads. He quieted and asked me what kind of farming I do. I told him, and when he asked if I used organic farming, I said no, and left it at that. I didn’t answer with the first thought that came to mind, which is simply this: I deal in the real world, not superstitions, and unless the consumer absolutely forces my hand, I am about as likely to adopt organic methods as the Wall Street Journal is to publish their next edition by setting the type by hand.

Young turkeys aren't smart enough to come in out of the rain, and will stand outside in a downpour, with beaks open and eyes skyward, until they drown.

He was a businessman, and I’m sure spends his days with spreadsheets, projections, and marketing studies. He hasn’t used a slide rule in his career and wouldn’t make projections with tea leaves or soothsayers. He does not blame witchcraft for a bad quarter, or expect the factory that makes his product to use steam power instead of electricity, or horses and wagons to deliver his products instead of trucks and trains. But he expects me to farm like my grandfather, and not incidentally, I suppose, to live like him as well. He thinks farmers are too stupid to farm sustainably, too cruel to treat their animals well, and too careless to worry about their communities, their health, and their families. I would not presume to criticize his car, or the size of his house, or the way he runs his business. But he is an expert about me, on the strength of one book, and is sharing that expertise with captive audiences every time he gets the chance. Enough, enough, enough. Read More

So many people that I talk to that have read Pollan’s books continue to tell me that his ideas sound very reasonable. But as the old saying goes, if it sounds to good to be true then it probably is. As I have said many times before, Pollan’s plan to feed the world would fall woefully short. It’s easy to be a farmer when you are writing a book, but it’s a much different story when you have 9 billion people looking to you to supply them with life-sustaining food. The worst part is that Pollan knows better but his quest to sell books has overwritten the things I taught him several years ago. He continues to sensationalize his story for his own personal gain.

Pacelle Says Go Veg To Save Planet

Ignoring the Cow in the Room
By Wayne Pacelle, CEO of HSUS, 7/30/09

Washington Post writer Ezra Klein has a large following of readers interested in his take on politics. The Economist even named him one of the “minds of the moment.” But it’s his views on animal agriculture’s substantial contribution to the climate change problem that caught my attention this week. I’ve blogged about the issue, and The HSUS even has an advertising campaign on the subject, but it’s still a matter far removed from the thoughts of most policy makers and even many environmental organizations.

In a Washington Post print edition column published yesterday, Klein reminds readers, or in many respects provides primary information to readers, about the connection between our societal demand for meat, egg, and dairy products and climate change. He notes that if we’re really concerned about climate change, “there's no reason to ignore the impact of what we put on our plates.” And, like The HSUS, he doesn’t demand all or nothing. Klein makes it clear: “Going vegetarian might not be as effective as going vegan, but it's better than eating meat, and eating meat less is better than eating meat more.”

If you want to take action on a personal level, there’s no better way to get engaged than to eat lower on the food chain, at least on a periodic basis. And as a matter of policy, we can no longer give a free pass to animal agribusiness if we are going to take a comprehensive look at the climate change problem.

For free recipes to get you started on trying meatless meals once in awhile or with whatever frequency you choose, check out www.humanesociety.org/recipes. Link

Yesterday I highlighted the misinformation that was included in an article which was advocating for eating less meat in order to halt global warming. Well, Wayne Pacelle didn’t miss this chance to forward on an article that was advocating vegetarianism. So even though he continues to say they aren’t advocating for the end of animal agriculture, their actions, and his blog, continue to say otherwise. Regardless of what he says where, there is no doubt that the Humane Society of the United States and Wayne Pacelle are trying to put family livestock operations out of business.

Consumer Survey

Consumers Positive Toward Farmers
By Pork news staff Thursday, July 30, 2009

There’s more insight on what consumers think about America’s farmers thanks to a survey of consumer views on U.S. agriculture conducted with funding from the United Soybean Board and soybean checkoff. Called the 2009 National Agricultural Image Survey, the study took place in February and surveyed a random sample of 1,000 registered voters with characteristics representative of the U.S. population. The results provide insights into seven main issues, including: the image of U.S. poultry and livestock producers a farmer attribute analysis and consumer attitudes on confinement livestock production, food prices, ag-related legislation, biobased products and biodiesel.

Some of the study’s key findings include:

Individuals who are somewhat or very favorable toward U.S. poultry and livestock producers rose from 69 percent in 2008 to 78 percent in 2009.

Top positive farmer attributes among consumers are that farm families know about protecting air and water quality and that most farmers take good care of their animals.

Nearly 90 percent of consumers do not see farmers as a major reason for increases in retail food prices.

Most consumers agree that it is important to subsidize farmers to ensure that there is a safe food supply.

After hearing that anti-confinement legislation could force Americans to get their milk, eggs and meat from foreign producers, 78 percent of consumers are against the legislation.

Consumers see energy security as the most important benefit of biobased products.

“It was great to see from the 2009 agricultural survey that overall, consumers have a very positive attitude toward agriculture,” says Vanessa Kummer, a USB director and soybean farmer from Colfax, N.D. “The survey is an important tool that helps USB develop effective messages to promote soy-based, environmentally safe products and the importance of maintaining animal agriculture.” Link

Survey after survey continues to show that consumers appreciate farmers and ranchers when they are supplied with accurate information to make an informed decision. This should reinforce to everyone why it’s so important for farmers and ranchers to talk to consumers and tell your story. You can have a great impact, one that will really benefit your industry.


Advocates for Agriculture

I’m dozing, as I often do on airplanes, but the guy behind me has been broadcasting nonstop for nearly three hours. I finally admit defeat and start some serious eavesdropping. He’s talking about food, damning farming, particularly livestock farming, compensating for his lack of knowledge with volume.

I’m so tired of people who wouldn’t visit a doctor who used a stethoscope instead of an MRI demanding that farmers like me use 1930s technology to raise food. Farming has always been messy and painful, and bloody and dirty. It still is.

But now we have to listen to self-appointed experts on airplanes frightening their seatmates about the profession I have practiced for more than 30 years. I’d had enough. I turned around and politely told the lecturer that he ought not believe everything he reads. He quieted and asked me what kind of farming I do. I told him, and when he asked if I used organic farming, I said no, and left it at that. I didn’t answer with the first thought that came to mind, which is simply this: I deal in the real world, not superstitions, and unless the consumer absolutely forces my hand, I am about as likely to adopt organic methods as the Wall Street Journal is to publish their next edition by setting the type by hand.

Young turkeys aren't smart enough to come in out of the rain, and will stand outside in a downpour, with beaks open and eyes skyward, until they drown.

He was a businessman, and I’m sure spends his days with spreadsheets, projections, and marketing studies. He hasn’t used a slide rule in his career and wouldn’t make projections with tea leaves or soothsayers. He does not blame witchcraft for a bad quarter, or expect the factory that makes his product to use steam power instead of electricity, or horses and wagons to deliver his products instead of trucks and trains. But he expects me to farm like my grandfather, and not incidentally, I suppose, to live like him as well. He thinks farmers are too stupid to farm sustainably, too cruel to treat their animals well, and too careless to worry about their communities, their health, and their families. I would not presume to criticize his car, or the size of his house, or the way he runs his business. But he is an expert about me, on the strength of one book, and is sharing that expertise with captive audiences every time he gets the chance. Enough, enough, enough. Read More

So many people that I talk to that have read Pollan’s books continue to tell me that his ideas sound very reasonable. But as the old saying goes, if it sounds to good to be true then it probably is. As I have said many times before, Pollan’s plan to feed the world would fall woefully short. It’s easy to be a farmer when you are writing a book, but it’s a much different story when you have 9 billion people looking to you to supply them with life-sustaining food. The worst part is that Pollan knows better but his quest to sell books has overwritten the things I taught him several years ago. He continues to sensationalize his story for his own personal gain.

Pacelle Says Go Veg To Save Planet

Ignoring the Cow in the Room
By Wayne Pacelle, CEO of HSUS, 7/30/09

Washington Post writer Ezra Klein has a large following of readers interested in his take on politics. The Economist even named him one of the “minds of the moment.” But it’s his views on animal agriculture’s substantial contribution to the climate change problem that caught my attention this week. I’ve blogged about the issue, and The HSUS even has an advertising campaign on the subject, but it’s still a matter far removed from the thoughts of most policy makers and even many environmental organizations.

In a Washington Post print edition column published yesterday, Klein reminds readers, or in many respects provides primary information to readers, about the connection between our societal demand for meat, egg, and dairy products and climate change. He notes that if we’re really concerned about climate change, “there's no reason to ignore the impact of what we put on our plates.” And, like The HSUS, he doesn’t demand all or nothing. Klein makes it clear: “Going vegetarian might not be as effective as going vegan, but it's better than eating meat, and eating meat less is better than eating meat more.”

If you want to take action on a personal level, there’s no better way to get engaged than to eat lower on the food chain, at least on a periodic basis. And as a matter of policy, we can no longer give a free pass to animal agribusiness if we are going to take a comprehensive look at the climate change problem.

For free recipes to get you started on trying meatless meals once in awhile or with whatever frequency you choose, check out www.humanesociety.org/recipes. Link

Yesterday I highlighted the misinformation that was included in an article which was advocating for eating less meat in order to halt global warming. Well, Wayne Pacelle didn’t miss this chance to forward on an article that was advocating vegetarianism. So even though he continues to say they aren’t advocating for the end of animal agriculture, their actions, and his blog, continue to say otherwise. Regardless of what he says where, there is no doubt that the Humane Society of the United States and Wayne Pacelle are trying to put family livestock operations out of business.

Consumer Survey

Consumers Positive Toward Farmers
By Pork news staff Thursday, July 30, 2009

There’s more insight on what consumers think about America’s farmers thanks to a survey of consumer views on U.S. agriculture conducted with funding from the United Soybean Board and soybean checkoff. Called the 2009 National Agricultural Image Survey, the study took place in February and surveyed a random sample of 1,000 registered voters with characteristics representative of the U.S. population. The results provide insights into seven main issues, including: the image of U.S. poultry and livestock producers a farmer attribute analysis and consumer attitudes on confinement livestock production, food prices, ag-related legislation, biobased products and biodiesel.

Some of the study’s key findings include:

Individuals who are somewhat or very favorable toward U.S. poultry and livestock producers rose from 69 percent in 2008 to 78 percent in 2009.

Top positive farmer attributes among consumers are that farm families know about protecting air and water quality and that most farmers take good care of their animals.

Nearly 90 percent of consumers do not see farmers as a major reason for increases in retail food prices.

Most consumers agree that it is important to subsidize farmers to ensure that there is a safe food supply.

After hearing that anti-confinement legislation could force Americans to get their milk, eggs and meat from foreign producers, 78 percent of consumers are against the legislation.

Consumers see energy security as the most important benefit of biobased products.

“It was great to see from the 2009 agricultural survey that overall, consumers have a very positive attitude toward agriculture,” says Vanessa Kummer, a USB director and soybean farmer from Colfax, N.D. “The survey is an important tool that helps USB develop effective messages to promote soy-based, environmentally safe products and the importance of maintaining animal agriculture.” Link

Survey after survey continues to show that consumers appreciate farmers and ranchers when they are supplied with accurate information to make an informed decision. This should reinforce to everyone why it’s so important for farmers and ranchers to talk to consumers and tell your story. You can have a great impact, one that will really benefit your industry.


Watch the video: Monsanto Ordered To Pay $289 Million In Roundup Cancer Trial. TODAY


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