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Shish kebab recipe

Shish kebab recipe



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  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Meat and poultry
  • Beef
  • Cuts of beef
  • Steak
  • Fillet steak

Beef is marinated in a mixture of lime juice and onion, seasoned with salt and pepper and grilled or barbecued. Serve with rice pilaf or pitta bread.

59 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 900g (2 lbs) beef fillet steak
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 onion, quartered and seperated
  • 1 green or red pepper, cut into chunks
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 pinch freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:15min ›Ready in:25min

  1. Cut beef into cubes. Toss in a mixing bowl along with oil, onion, peppers, salt, black pepper and lime juice. Mix well, cover, and refrigerate overnight.
  2. Preheat oven grill, griddle pan or barbecue.
  3. Thread beef, onion and peppers onto skewers, 6 to 8 pieces per skewer and cook for 3 to 4 minutes per side.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(40)

Reviews in English (32)

by BSCOTT78

Used different ingredients.So *that's* how you marinate it! Second time around, I alternated cherry tomatoes and shallots between the pieces of meat. Getting the extra skewers lead -- counter-intuitively -- to a healthier meal. This is because a skewerful of meat is a deceptively large portion. The additions also improved the presentation and flavour. Next time, I will add some fresh green chillies to the overnight marinade.-24 Jul 2008

by TDINSTL

Used different ingredients.My husband's family make kebab by omitting the lime juice and marinating the meat in yoghurt mixed with one minced onion. I also add a pinch of dried mint. We barbecue these with onion wedges and tomatoes and serve it with Persian rice.-24 Jul 2008

by A277387

I used a cheap cut of beef for this recipe and I think it was a mistake. Using a fillet would have produced a much more tender result. It was delicious none-the-less.-24 Jul 2008


Marinated Steak Shish Kabobs Recipe

I have always considered grilling to be the “man’s job”. Whenever we are grilling for dinner, I get everything ready so all my husband has to do is slap it on the grill.

I had a hankering for steak last week, but knew my husband had meetings at night which left any and all grilling up to me. I mean, really, how hard can it be?

I was totally right. I turned that baby on, and the next thing I knew I was a grilling champ. I felt a little bit like I could have been on Iron Chef with all the flames, smoke and meat.

Anyway, this recipe is so simple and delicious that it can make anyone feel like a fabulous chef. If I can do it, so can you.


Gallery

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil, divided
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary
  • 3 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 pound beef tenderloin, trimmed and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 cups cherry tomatoes
  • 1 large red onion, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 yellow bell pepper, seeded and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • ½ pound cremini mushrooms, stemmed and halved
  • Cooking spray

Combine 2 teaspoons oil, rosemary, and garlic in a large zip-top bag. Add beef seal and marinate in refrigerator 1 hour, turning occasionally. Remove beef from bag discard marinade. Thread beef evenly onto 6 (12-inch) wooden skewers sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon black pepper.

Combine remaining 1 teaspoon oil and juice in a large bowl. Add tomatoes, onion, bell pepper, and mushrooms, tossing to coat. Thread each vegetable separately onto 12 (12-inch) skewers sprinkle with remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon black pepper. Place beef and vegetable kebabs on an electric grill coated with cooking spray. Grill onion and pepper kebabs 10 minutes. Grill beef kebabs 9 minutes or until desired degree of doneness. Grill tomato and mushroom kebabs 7 minutes.


Grilling the Shish Tawook

I know that we all tend to overcook chicken for fear of contamination, but since we’re grilling smaller chunks, and especially if you’re using metal skewers, chicken cooks much faster that way. And the longer you marinate the chicken the quicker it grills. The recommendation here is to grill on medium heat between 12-18 minutes max.


Shashlik (Russian Shish Kebabs)

Shashlik (Шашлык) is a type of shish kebab commonly found in Russia and the former Soviet republics. It was likely brought to Moscow from Central Asia in the 19th century. Today, it’s a popular summer food cooked over an open fire at social gatherings. It’s traditionally prepared with lamb, but chicken, pork, and beef variations are becoming increasingly prominent. With summer in full swing throughout the country right now, I thought it would be a great time to share this tasty dish!

There are a few tricks that I came up with when developing this recipe that I think are pretty sweet. While the dish is traditionally marinated in either vinegar or lemon juice, I found that the combination of lemon juice and apple cider vinegar gives the meat a tangy and subtly sweet flavor. Secondly, leaving the salt out of the marinade and saving it for the last stage of the recipe provides for a really great complementary texture to the tender and juicy meat.

You’ll Need:
1/2 lamb shoulder (2 lbs)
2 medium onions, blended
6 cloves garlic, blended
4 bay leaves
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1/4 cup water
juice of 1/2 lemon (2 tsp)
1 tbsp black pepper
1 tbsp oregano
1 tsp sea salt

I had my eye on this beautifully-marbled lamb shoulder from Lava Lake Lamb for a while now, and it was the perfect cut of meat for this dish. It’s such a versatile cut of meat that I actually only used half of it (two of its four pounds) so that I could save the rest for another creation!

Don’t forget that I’m giving away a $100 Lava Lake Lamb gift card this week it’s easy to enter! See here for details.

Cut the lamb into 2″ chunks, and place in a ziploc bag.

In a blender or food processor, blend the onion, garlic, and water. Combine with the bay leaves, apple cider vinegar, pepper, oregano, and lemon juice and pour everything into the ziploc bag. Marinate in the fridge for four hours.

After four hours, skewer the lamb pieces (if using wooden skewers, soak them for 30 minutes first) and warm up your grill on med/high heat.

Grill on direct heat, rotating the skewers with a pair of tongs every few minutes, and sprinkle the salt over the skewers as they cook.

When you have a hard time looking at the skewers because they are so delicious, remove them from the grill. Should take about 10 minutes altogether.

Let the shashlik rest for five minutes and serve. This dish is commonly served outdoors in Russia, with fresh, lightly-salted vegetables like tomato, mushrooms, or cucumbers as its only accompaniment. Enjoy!


Mustafa’s Turkish Chicken Shish Kebab

Given you are exploring this website, I imagine you probably agree with the idea that ‘ food transports you to a different place’ – and if you haven ’ t already experienced it, hopefully these recipes and stories will help you do just that. I believe that food really can transport you, and for me, this recipe especially transports me to a wonderful place and time in my life that I truly miss.

I was born in Baghdad, the capital of Iraq, and grew up there for the first 11 years of my life, experiencing both the good years and the war towards the end before my family (my parents, older brother and I) sought refuge in Jordan. My childhood in Iraq was spent predominantly at our large home, living with my family, grandparents and other uncles and their families.

Growing up I began to learn more about my family. My mother is from Northern Iraq and has a Turkish grandmother, so my mother’s family’s traditions were very different to my father’s side. I remember driving uphill into the hills towards my grandparents in Northern Iraq and the air just feels different, it almost has no live city and it’s filled with mountains, rivers and beautiful nature. We used to refuel our water supply from a cold and clean river near my mother’s old house. The language is also different, my mother’s family could speak and understand Turkish very well, and most of their slang is influenced from Turkey.

Which leads me to the point of experiencing the food from both ends, traditional ‘Baghdadi’ food is beautiful but Northen Iraq was a lot more unique, in such case this recipe itself, my grandmothers favourite dish.

I believe the 11 years I spent in Iraq have played the greatest role in sharing me to be the person I am today. They were some incredible years, filled with laughter and joy, and family. My father’s whole family was centred in an area, close to everyone, and we would spend our days in each other’s houses, learning from all my uncles and aunties, growing up with all my cousins… They’re the sweetest memories I can recall.

Some people think the war period/years must have been traumatic and damaging to my childhood, and in some ways, there absolutely were some horrible moments. The American invasion into Iraq in 2003 lead to the deaths of more than 170,000 Iraqi casualties. We lost a lot during the war: people? buildings? Jobs? Can you detail what was lost?

Imagine being a child who attends school and has a best friend, visits his family quite often, lives a normal life, then one day everything just stops, and you find yourself stuck in a bunker with the rest of your family, in a darkly lit room, wearing a gas mask and listening to old Arabic songs as your mother tries to hold headsets over your ears so you don’t hear all the bombings going on close to our house. And that was that, that was the life we lived for 6 months, not knowing what might have happened to my friend, losing an uncle during the bombing, seeing the emotional suffering my parents had as they desperately tried to communicate with their extended family to see if they were ok, only to be welcomed with the sound of a dead telephone line. It was the toughest period in our lives. But there was also a significant silver lining beneath it all.

Soon after, my family decided to flee illegally by car to seek refuge in Jordan. Jordan at the time, and to this day, is one of the most accepting countries in the Arabic realm. At the end of last year (2019), the number of refugees registered in Jordan stood at 744,795 persons (UNHCR figures), among them are refugees from Syria, Iraq, Yemen, Sudan and more.

As we settled in Jordan for 5 years, we adapted to a different way of living, and under the UNHCR, they continue to provide us with education, health and cash assistance to help us with our re-settlement. Then an opportunity came up to migrate to Australia and live with our uncle who’s been here for over 2 decades. And we moved to Sydney.

With meat supplies becoming harder to attain with war time restrictions, I don ’ t remember having this dish regularly, but that ’ s what made it so special. Its rarity created such vivid and surreal memories and they remain with me, I can still summon up the taste of this mouth-watering shish kebab that my mother made back in those days and when we have it now, memories of family in Baghdad and northern Iraq, of people and places, come flooding back.


Shashlik (Russian Shish Kebabs)

Shashlik is a type of shish kebab commonly found in Russia and the former Soviet republics. It was likely brought to Moscow from Central Asia in the 19th century. Today, it’s a popular summer food cooked over an open fire at social gatherings. It’s traditionally prepared with lamb, but chicken, pork, and beef variations are becoming increasingly prominent.

Ingredients

Directions

Step 1

Cut the lamb into 2" chunks, and place in a non reactive bowl or ziploc bag.

Step 2

In a blender or food processor, blend the onion, garlic, and water. Combine with the bay leaves, apple cider vinegar, pepper, oregano, and lemon juice and pour everything into the non reactive bowl or ziploc bag. Marinate in the fridge for four hours.

Step 3

After four hours, skewer the lamb pieces (if using wooden skewers, soak them for 30 minutes first) and warm up your grill on med/high heat.

Step 4

Grill on direct heat, rotating the skewers with a pair of tongs every few minutes, and sprinkle the salt over the skewers as they cook.

Step 5

When you have a hard time looking at the skewers because they are so delicious, remove them from the grill. Should take about 10 minutes altogether.

Step 6

Let the shashlik rest for five minutes and serve. This dish is commonly served outdoors in Russia, with fresh, lightly-salted vegetables like tomato, mushrooms, or cucumbers as its only accompaniment. Enjoy!


NOTES

Nutrition

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Disclaimer: Nutrition facts are derived from linked ingredients (shown at left in colored bullets) and may or may not be complete. Always consult a licensed nutritionist or doctor if you have a nutrition-related medical condition.

Calories per serving: 75

Get detailed nutrition information, including item-by-item nutrition insights, so you can see where the calories, carbs, fat, sodium and more come from.


Ingredients of Seekh Kebabs

  • 150 Gram mutton (keema, minced)
  • 100 gram chicken (minced)
  • 2 tsp ginger-garlic paste
  • 1 tsp onion paste
  • 1 tsp red chilli powder
  • 1 tsp coriander powder
  • 1 tsp cumin powder
  • 3/4 tsp pepper, powdered
  • 1 tsp dried mango powder
  • 1/4 tsp saunth (dry ginger powder)
  • 2 tsp oil
  • 1 1/2 tbsp cashew paste
  • 1 1/2 tbsp cream
  • 2 tbsp besan
  • 1 Egg yolk
  • to taste salt
  • for garnishing coriander leaves

How to Serve Authentic Shish Kebab

  • Another unique feature of authentic shish kebab is serving the lamb skewers alongside thinly sliced or shaved onion tossed in sumac seasoning. We like to mix sumac and za’atar seasoning (shown above). You can soak the onion slices in cold water for 30 minutes to take the edge off if you’d like, then squeeze out the water and toss with spice.
  • Either fire-roasted tomato skewers orsliced fresh tomatoes are a very common side.
  • Parsley is the fresh herb of choice used as garnish.
  • Either flat bread (commonly lavash, substitute with pita) or rice are the carb of choice.

TIP: Sumac is a red powder from the dried and pulverized berries of the sumac bush, indigenous to several Middle East countries. It has a pleasant lemony flavor. You can substitute with lemon zest and a squeeze of lemon juice.